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Full text of "The Heritage Lodge no. 730, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C. : proceedings 1979-1980"

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Wyt Heritage Ho&ge JU730 

a. s. & 3. 4W., #. ».c 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Keith R.A. Flynn, W.M. 
P.O.Box 119, Main St. , 
Atwood, Ontario, 
NOG 1BO 

(519) 356-2845 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

(519) 621-4995 



Vol. 03, No. 01 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



October, 1979 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting 
and subsequent General Purpose Committee Meeting, Proceedings of the 
Tenth Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, September 19th, 1979, Elec- 
tion of Officers, and the announcements for several coming events. 

Please Note - The opinions expressed by the authors and reviewers 
in these Proceedings are not necessarily those of the Lodge or its mem 
bers . 

SUMMONS 

Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By direction from the Worshipful Master, you are hereby requested 
to attend the Eleventh Regular Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the North-East corner of the inter- 
section of Highways No. 401 and No. 24 on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 21st, 1979, at 7:30 PM 

prompt for the purpose of the Installation and Investiture of the 
Worshipful Master and Officers, and the introduction and transaction 
of such business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. 

V. W. Bro. Randall D. Langs will be the Installing Master. Also 
on this occasion, W. Bro. Greg Robinson will present a paper tit-led 
"MORGAN: THE CANADIAN CONNECTION." Written reviews by V. W. Bro. 
Lawrence Runnals; W. Bros. George Campbell and Donald H. Gorman; and 
Bro. Glen T. Jones, will also be presented. 

GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

The General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held on 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20th, 1980, at 7:30 PM. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and Appointed 
Committees are urgently requested to attend. All Lodge Members are 
particularly welcome. 

Fraternally yours, 

W. Bro. James A. Faulkner, 
Secretary . 



- 2 - 

PROCEEDINGS 

The Tenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730 was held 
in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, September 
19th, 1979, with 11 Officers, 34 Members and 7 Visitors, for a total 
of 52 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:45 PM with 
Worshipful Master, R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn in the East. The Brethern 
were welcomed by the Worshipful Master who called on the Chaplain to 
attend the Altar. 

AT THE ALTAR 

Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers approached the altar and read from Ecc. 3rd 
Chapter. 

APOLOGIES 

Apologies were received by correspondence from R. W. Bros. Allan 
Newell, Edsel Steen, Bill Lowe, James Hutchinson and William Isbister; 
also from V. W. Bro. Jack Pos, who was attending a meeting in Chicago. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Grinton, seconded by R. W. 
Bro. Groshaw, that the minutes of the Ninth Regular Meeting, held on 
Wednesday, May 16, 1979, be adopted as circulated in the Lodge Pro- 
ceedings, Vol. 02, No. 06, September, 1979. Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The Report's of Committees on the Applications for Affiliation, 
which were listed in the Proceedings (Vol. 2, No. 6) dated September, 
1979, as well as three carry-overs from the previous month, namely; 
R. W. Bro. Arthur Albert Baxter, Bro. Dorian Arthur Baxter and Bro. 
Glenson Trevelyn Jones, all reported- favorable. 

MOTION 

It was Regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Groshaw, seconded by R. W. 
Bro. Woodburn, that the Reports be received, the Committees discharged 
and the Applications balloted upon. Carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From R. W. Bro. Wallace McLeod, dated July 26, 1979, enclosing 4 
copies of his paper for the reviewers. 

2. From W. Bro. Balfour LeGresley, dated August 4, 1979, enclosing a 
letter from W. Bro. Donald Morgan of Perserverence Lodge No. 21, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, dated July 26, 1979; advising that The 
Heritage Lodge would be most welcome to attend their 200th Anniversary 
Banquet on Saturday, November 10th, 1979 (6:30 PM) . The Grand Master 
of Pennsylvania and his Officers will be attending. He also cautioned 
that they must close reservations at 2400. Tickets are $10.00. As of 
July 26th, they had already made 1500 reservations for their own 
members and guests. 

3. From R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn, advising that he had received a phone 
call from Bro. G. T. Jones, enquiring as to the delay in processing 
his application. (Secretary stated that all reports had not been 
received from the Investigating Committee at that time) . 



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4. From Preston - New Hope Masonic Holding Corporation, announcing 
that the rental rate for our Lodge for the 1979-1980 year will be 
$400.00. (An increase of 48.15% over last year, and a total of 60.651 
over the past two years). 

5. From Bro . John E. Taylor, a member for Hilton Bench near Sault 
St. Marie and one of the speakers scheduled for next year, stating 
that he had a collection of Masonic slides of general interest, and 
enquiring if they would be of interest to the Lodge. Also, he has 
now collected a great deal of information on Research Lodges from 
which he could prepare a short paper, giving his recommendations on 
which have the most to offer for the money. 

6. From Dominion Regalia, dated August 31st, 1979, giving a quotation 
as follows: 

Masonic Officers Collars $29.50 

Officers Collar Jewels, chrome 10. 00 

TOTAL $39.50 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W. Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by 
R. W. Bro. David Bradley, that the correspondence be received and 
the necessary action taken. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $646.29 were presented, and 
on a motion by R. W. Bro. Grinton, seconded by R. W. Bro. Groshaw, 
were passed and ordered payed. 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage up to August 29th, 1979 $ 18.45 

Post Office deposit account: 

(Third Class Mail Contract) 60.00 

Postage (September Proceedings) 34.95 

Mrs. Ross Perry, Fergus: 

Typing May Proceedings 

(26% pages) 26.50 

Guelph Printing Service, Guelph 

Printing May Proceedings 

(378 @ 28 pages) 
Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corp. 

Rent 1978-1979 year 
W. Bro. Donald Kaufman 

Refreshments (September Meeting) 

TOTAL $646.29 

At this time, the Worshipful Master called on R. W. Bro. Ed. 
Wilson for a Report from the Treasurer: The report covered one full 
year with a recommendation to purchase a $1,000.00 bond. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Grinton, seconded by V. W. 
Bro. Langs, that the Treasurer be authorized to purchase a $1,000.00 
bond. Carried. 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation were received from the following: 

1. BODLEY, William G., P.M.; 105 Warwood Rd . , Islington, Ontario; 
Age 57; Police Officer; Member of Connaught Lodge No. 501, G.R.C 
recommended by R. W. Bro. J. W. Gerrard and W. Bro. E. J. B. 
Anderson. 



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270 


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17 


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2. COPELAND, A. Lou, P.D.D.G.M.; 9 Peveril Hill South, Toronto, 
Ontario; Member of Palestine Lodge No. 559, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R. W. Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and W. Bro . Balfour LeGresley. 

3. COUPAR, David, P.M.; 68 Upper Walker Ave., S., Stoney Creek, 
Ontario; Age. 76; Retired Bank Manager; Member of Doric Lodge 
No. 382, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W. Bro. Joseph Hobson and R. 
W. Bro. W. James Curtis. 

4. GARDINER, Ralph Eldred, P.G.S.; P.O. Box 1123, Station B, Fort 
Erie, Ontario; Age 74; Retired; Member of Vittoria Lodge No. 359, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R. W. Bro. C. A. Sankey and R. W. Bro. Wm. 
A . H . Lowe . 

5. SANDISON, Donald L . , P . D.D.G .M. ; 21 Horner St., Brantford, Ontario; 
Age 57; Maintenance Mechanic; Member of Reba Lodge No. 515, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R. W. Bro. Donald Grinton and R. W. Bro. Allan 
Newell. 

6. HARVEY, George Valentine, M.M. ; 686 Westdale Crt . , Oshawa, Ontario; 
Age 62; Tool Technician; Member of Cedar Lodge No. 270, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W. Bro. Wm . H. Perryman and V. W. Bro. Jack Pos. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by V. W. Bro. Langs, seconded by R. W. 
Bro. Bradley, that the Applications be received and the usual commit- 
tees appointed. 

REPORTS OF STANDING AND APPOINTED COMMITTEES 

Several reports had been presented at the General Purpose Com- 
mittee Meeting, August 29, 1979, important items will be discussed 
under General Business. In addition, the following two items were 
introduced at this time: 

1. From R. W. Bro. Ed Ralph, Chairman of the Committee on Membership 
and Unattached Masons. R. W. Bro. Ralph presented a proposal for 
an information type bulletin; and asked the Brethren for comments 
regarding the format and the information presented. 

2. From W. Bro. LeGresley, Chairman of the Central Data Bank Commit- 
tee, requesting that a reference be inserted in the next summons 
that all Brethren be deputized to gather and/or report all 
happenings throughout the various districts in the Grand Juris- 
diction relating to the 125th Anniversary Celebrations. 

BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Groshaw, seconded by Bro. 
Rivers, that the Ballot be taken collectively. Carried. 

At this time, three of the Candidates, who were present in the 
Lodge, were permitted to retire, and returned after the ballot. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applicants, the Worshipful 
Master declared: R. W. Bros., Arthur Albert Baxter, William Allan 
Strutt and Arthur Wellington Watson; W. Bros., Thomas E. Crowley, 
Frank G. Dunn, Brian Fenry, D. Neil Gardner, Peter Maydan, Arthur 
Reginald Medhurst, Percy Moffat and Henry C. Wolfe; and Bros., 
Dorian Arthur Baxter, William Hardy Craig, Frederick D. Gegenschatz, 
Alexander Grar.t, Glenson Trevelyn Jones, Arthur Clarence Linter, 
Howard McCandless, Peter David Park and Donald John Thornton eligible 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, and I request that they 
affix their signatures in our Register in token of their submission to 
our Bv-Laws . 



GENERAL BUSINESS 

1. The Worshipful Master reminded the Founding Officers of the 
Lodge that a general agreement had been prepared whereby each Officer 
contribute to the Treasurer, sufficient funds to purchase the Collar 
and Jewel of his office as a donation to the Lodge ($40.00). Six of 
the seventeen Officers (including the new office of historian) have 
contributed to date. He suggested that an attempt be made to have the 
new regalia for the November Installation. 

2. The Worshipful Master called on the Report of the Special 
Committee investigating a proposal for an alternate meeting night. 
There was no one present to make a report. (This is the third con- 
secutive meeting that no report has been received since the committee 
was appointed in 1978) . 

3. The motion concerning a subscription fee for the Lodge Pro- 
ceedings, which was talked about at the last Regular Meeting was re- 
introduced. 

MOTION 

Following considerable discussion by R. W. Bros. Ed. Wilson, 
Wallace McLeod, Donald Grinton; V. W. Bro. Randall Langs and W. Bros. 
John Neu; it was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. McLeod and seconded by 
R. W. Bro. Grinton, that The Heritage Lodge Proceedings may be pur- 
chased by any Brother Mason outside our Grand Jurisdiction for an 
annual subscription fee of $10.00. Carried. 

4. The subject dealing with' the increase in Rent for the coming 
year was discussed. 

MOTION 

On a motion by R. W. Bro. Woodburn, seconded R. W. Bro. Ralph, 
the Worshipful Master was requested to appoint a Committee to meet 
with the Preston-New Hope Temple Corp. on September 26th, 1979. 

5. At this time the Worshipful Master announced several propo- 
sals for the celebration of the 125th Anniversary of the formation of 
the Grand Lodge. R. W. Bro. John Woodburn suggested that The 
Heritage Lodge might sponsor the re-enactment of the events that led 
up to the formation of the Grand Lodge in October, 1855. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W. Bro. Cohoe, seconded by R. W. Bro. 
Drew, that The Heritage Lodge accept the invitation to meet with. the 
Grand Lodge to discuss the subject of re-enacting the formation of 
the Grand Lodge. Carried. 

NOTICE OF MOTION 

The following notice of motion was presented by R. W. Bro. 
Charles Grimwood: "I hereby give NOTICE OF MOTION that I will move 
or cause to be moved that the By-Laws of The Heritage Lodge, No. 730, 
be amended to accomodate the Office of Historian as an Officer of The 
Heritage Lodge, No. 730; 

ARTICLE V ... OFFICERS ... Part 1 ... insert, 'HISTORIAN' 
after organist. 

ARTICLE VI . . . DUTIES OF OFFICERS ... Part 16 . . . Delete (Not 
an Officer) . 



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- 6 - 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

The Worshipful Master called on W. Bro . A. Bagg of Bedford Lodge 
No. 638, Toronto, and W. Bro. V. Harvey of Cedar Lodge No. 270, 
Oshawa, to act as scrutineers. 

Following the election by written ballots and after thanking the 
Brethren who assisted as scrutineers, R. W. Bro. Flynn declared the 
following Brethren as Officers Elect for their respective offices: 

Bro. Donald S. Grinton 

Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 

Bro. George E. Zwicker 

Bro. Jacob Pos 

Bro. W. E. Wilson 

OPEN VOTE AND MOTIONS 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Grinton, seconded by R. W. 
Bro. Drew, that R. W. Bro. C. F. Grimwood be Tyler of the Lodge. 
Carried. 

It was regularly moved by V. W. Bro. Langs, seconded by R. W. 
Bro. McLeod, that V. W. Bro. Robert McMaster and V. W. Bro. Robert 
Lawson be the Lodge Auditors. Carried. 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. McVittie, seconded by Bro. 
Rivers that the Examining Board for the Worshipful Master be V. W. Bro 
Langs, R. W. Bro. Parsons and R. W. Bro. Greenaway. Carried. 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Drew, seconded by W. Bro. 
Zwicker, that a hearty vote of thanks and appreciation be extended to 
R. W. Bro. William S. McVittie for his dedication to the office of 
Tyler and the Masonic Education he gives to all latecomers. Carried 
by the applause of the Brethren. 

WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS 

The Worshipful Master announced that the Proceedings of the 
recent Regional Masonic Workshop were 'printed and available from the 
Secretary. 

R. W. Bro. Grinton asked the newly elected Officers to meet with 
him following the closing of the Lodge. 

INTRODUCTION OF GUEST SPEAKER 

R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn, the Worshipful Master, introduced R. W. 
Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, who had recently been nominated to full 
membership in the Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, England and 
who presented a very informative paper titled: 

"NEW LIGHT ON JOHN COUSTOS" 

1. WHO WAS JOHN COUSTOS? 

On June 28, 1979, it was my privilege to attend Quatuor 
Coronati Lodge, in London - the premier Lodge of Masonic research - 
and there present a paper. That paper will eventually be published 
at full length in the lodge's transactions. This evening I propose 
to give you the paper as it was edited for oral delivery in London; 
a lot of the duller parts have been cut out, and a certain amount of 
additional material has been inserted. 

"As for himself, he would rather suffer death 
than betray the sacred trust reposed in him." 



Some of you may have heard those words somewhere. I want to talk to 
you for a few minutes about a man, now forgotten, who was once regarded 
as a hero of Free Masonry, because he followed that ideal. Long, long 
ago, more than two centuries ago, a book was published in London; its 
title was, in the fashion of the day, amply descriptive. It^be^an as 
follows: The Sufferings of John Coustos, for Free -Mas onry^and for j 
His refusing to turn Roman Catholic, in the Inquisition a/£ Lisbon; "^/ 
Where he was sentenced, during Four Years , to the Galley;\and .afterwards 
releas'd from thence by the gracious Interposition of his present 
Majesty King George II . 

The book was incredibly popular; it was translated into 
French and German, and went through some twenty editions over the next 
seventy-five years. 

We might just take a brief look at the story it tells us. 
John Coustos was born in Switzerland in 1703. As a child he was taken 
to England, and was raised there to be a diamond cutter. He went to 
France in 1736, and worked in Paris for five years. Then he went to 
Lisbon, Portugal. His original hope had been to go to America, to 
the Portuguese colony of Brazil, where diamonds had been discovered in 
1729, and where there are still rich diamond mines; but he was unable 
to get authorization, so he stayed in Lisbon, plying his trade. While 
there, he established a Masonic Lodge, with himself as Master; and 
that caused his troubles. Masonry had been banned by the Catholic 
Church in 1738, and was illegal in Portugal. 

Apparently the wife of another jeweller in the city was 
jealous of Coustos's success; and in order to remove one of her hus- 
band's rivals, she denounced him to the authorities as a Free Mason. 
In March of 1743 he was arrested and taken to the Prison of the 
Inquisition, where he remained for fifteen months. Let us hear his 
own words . 

"A little after, the... Officer... bid the Guards 
search me; and take away all the Gold, Silver, Papers, 
Knives, Scissors, Buckles, $c. I might have about me. 
They then led me to a lonely Dungeon, expressly 
forbidding me to speak loud, or knock at the Walls; 
but that, in case I wanted any Thing, to beat against 
the Door, with a Padlock, that hung on the outward 
Door; and which I could reach, by thrusting my Arm 
through the Iron Grates" (pages 19-20). 

After a few days there, he was shaved, and his hair cropped, 
and he was led before the Inquisitors for the first time. After. a 
little beating about the bush, they made it clear that he had been 
arrested for Masonry, and that they wanted more information. So he 
told them that it was a society devoted to Charity, where religious 
controversy was forbidden. He was examined a number of times, and 
after each interrogation was remanded to his solitary cell for a 
longer or shorter period. 

During the fifth examination, the following exchange took 
place. 

Inquisitors : "We insist that you reveal to us the Secrets of this 
Art." 

Coustos : "The Oath (I took at my Admission) . . . will not permit me to 
do it ; Conscience forbids me; and I therefore hope your Lordships 
are too equitable to use Compulsion." 



- 8 - 

Inquisitors : "Your Oath is as nothing in our Presence: and we ab- 
solve you from it." 

Coustos : "Your Lordships are very gracious; but as I am firmly per- 
suaded, that it is not in the Power of any Being upon Earth to 
free me from my Oath, I am firmly determin'd never to violate 
it." (pages 34-35) 

And so, back to the dungeon. 

In the ninth examination, he was strongly urged with threats 
to turn Catholic; but Coustos expressed his firm resolution to live 
and die a Protestant. 

Finally, he was brought before the tribunal for the thir- 
teenth time. He tells us what happened then. "... The President.... 
order' d a Paper, containing Part of my Sentence, to be read. I 
thereby was doom'd to suffer the Tortures employ 'd by the Holy Office, 
for refusing to tell the Truth...; for my not discovering the Secrets 
of Masonry. ..." 






r 



"I hereupon was instantly convey'd to the Torture-Room, built in 
the Form of a square Tower, where no Light appear* d, but what two 
Candles gave: And, to prevent the dreadful Cries and shocking Groans 
of the unhappy Victims, from reaching the Ears of the other Prisoners, 
the Doors are lin'd with a sort of Quilt.... At my entring this 
infernal Place, I saw myself... surrounded by six Wretches, who, after 
preparing the Tortures, strip'd me naked (all to Linen Drawers); when 
laying me on my Back, they began to lay hold of every Part of my Body 
First, they put round my neck an Iron Collar, which was fastned to th 
Scaffold; they then fix'd a Ring to each Foot; and this being done, 
they stretched my Limbs with all their Might. They next wound two 
Ropes round each Arm, and two round each Thigh, which Ropes pass'd 
under the Scaffold, through Holes made for that Purpose; and were all 
drawn tight, at the same time, by four Men, upon a Signal made for 
this Purpose.... These Ropes, which were of the Size of one's little 
Finger, pierc'd through my Flesh quite to the Bone; making the blood 
gush out at the eight different Places that were thus bound. As I 
persisted in refusing,... the Ropes were thus drawn together four 
different Times. At my Side stood a Physician and Surgeon, who often 
felt my Temples, to judge of the Danger I might be in; by which Means 
my Tortures were suspended, at Intervals,.... The last time the 
Ropes were drawn tight, I grew so exceedingly weak, occasioned by the 
Blood's Circulation being stopp'd, and the Pains I endur'd, that I 
fainted quite away; insomuch that I was carried back to my Dungeon...' 

"They were so inhuman, six Weeks after, as to expose me to 
another kind of Torture.... They made me stretch my Arms in such a 
Manner, that the Palms of my Hands were turn ' d outward; when, by the 
Help of a Rope that fastned them together at the Wrist, and which 
they turn'd by an Engine; they drew them gently nearer to one another 
behind, in such a Manner that the Back of each Hand touch 1 d, and 
stood exactly parallel one to the other; whereby both my Shoulders 
were dislocated, and a considerable Quantity of Blood issued from my 
Mouth. This Torture was repeated thrice; after which I was again 
taken to my Dungeon, and put into the Hands of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, who, in setting my Bones, put me to exquisite Pain." 

"Two months after,... I was again conveyed to the Torture- 
Room, and there made to undergo another Kind of Punishment twice.... 
The Torturers turn'd twice round my Body, a thick Iron Chain, which, 
crossing upon my Stomach, terminated afterwards at my Wrists. They 
next set my Back against a thick Board, at each Extremity whereof 



was a Pulley, through which there run a Rope, that catch'd the Ends of 
the Chains at my Wrists. The Tormentors when stretching these Ropes, 
by Means of a Roller, press 'd or bruis'd my Stomach, in proportion as 
the Ropes were drawn tighter. They tortured me, on this Occasion, to 
such a Degree, that my Wrists and Shoulders, were put out of joint." 

"The Surgeons, however, set them presently after". (Pages 
61-66). 

He was remanded back to the dungeon. "The Reader may 
judge..." he says, "of the dreadful Anguish I must have labour'd 
under.... Most of my Limbs were put out of Joint, and bruis'd in such 
a Manner, that I was unable, during some Weeks, to lift my Hand to my 
Mouth; my Body being vastly swell 'd, by the Inflammations caus'd by 
the frequent Dislocations. I have ... Reason to fear, that I shall feel 
the sad Effects... so long as I live...". (pages 66-67). 

Finally, on June 21, 1744, Coustos was taken out and sen- 
tenced, being condemned to four years in the galleys. After four 
months, the British Minister at Lisbon intervened, and got Coustos 
his freedom. He returned to London, and wrote his book. 

Well, from this summary you can see why Coustos was regarded 
as a Masonic hero. Here was a man who remained steadfast to his 
obligations in the face of the most apalling mistreatment! A real 
example for us all to follow! 

2. NEW SOURCES OF INFORMATION ' 

In the past twenty-five years, a wealth of new material 
dealing with Coustos has been found. We now know a bit about his 
lodges in London. We have discovered the actual minute book of a 
lodge to which he belonged in Paris. And, most important of all, the 
Portuguese archives have yielded up a full dossier on Coustos 's trial 
in Lisbon, with transcriptions of the denunciations against him, and 
a record of his examinations by the Inquisitors. 

Some time ago the Masonic Book Club resolved to issue a 
facsimile reprint of The Sufferings of John Coustos . The President, 
Bro . Louis L. Williams^ invited your speaker to prepare a critical 
introduction. It soon became clear that there were still many 
questions that needed answers. Who were Coustos 's Masonic associates? 
What social class did he move in? Did his Masonry follow English or 
French traditions? Exactly when was his book published? Is the 
historical background relevant? What can we say about the other 
editions of the book? These questions will claim our attention for 
the remainder of this paper. 

3. COUSTOS 'S LODGES IN LONDON 

Let us begin with his lodges in London. 

The first Minute book of the Grand Lodge of England covers 
the years 1723-1731. It includes a "List of the Names of the Members 
of all the regular Lodges as they were returned in the Year 1730." 
The name of John Coustos appears twice. 

Lodge No. 75 met at the Rainbow Coffee House in the York 
Buildings, London. It had sixty- three members, which makes it one of 
the four largest lodges to submit returns in 1730. Other lodges 
included peers of the realm, or Fellows of the Royal Society, or 
people who became famous for other reasons. No. 75 was not like that. 
It had several active Masons; the Junior Grand Warden for 1731, and 



- 10 - 

Grand Stewards for 1731, 1732 and 1733. It had a younger son of the 
Duke of Devonshire. It had about fifteen members who bore French 
names, one of them being John Coustos. And it had a Mr. Henry Price, 
who in 1733 was named Provincial Grand Master of New England. It is a 
charming thought that the hero of our paper may actually have sat in 
lodge with the founder of duly constituted Masonry in America. 

Two years later, in 1732, a new lodge was formed, No. 98, 
meeting at Prince Eugene's Coffee Mouse in St. Alban's Street, London. 
It submitted returns in the so-called list of 1730. It had only 
thirty members, and all but four bore French names. About nine of 
them had come over in a block from Lodge No. 75, including our friend 
Coustos. In 1739 this lodge took the name "Union French Lodge," and 
we may safely assume that its language was French. A document in 
the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris says that Coustos "had been Master 
of five lodges in England;" and one of the witnesses told the 
Portuguese Inquisitors that "not only in' France, but also in the 
Kingdom of England, the aforesaid Coustos had been Master of a Lodge." 
My guess is that at some date between 1732 and 1736 he actually became 
Master of Lodge No. 98, the French Lodge. 

4. COUSTOS' S LODGE IN PARIS 

About 1736, Coustos tells us, he went to Paris. He joined a 
lodge there. Its minutes from December 1736 to July 1737 were seized 
in a police raid, and still survive. They make fascinating reading. 
At first Coustos was Master. Then, after February, when the Duke de 
Villeroy joined and was chosen Master, Coustos continued to occupy 
the Chair regularly as his deputy. We can draw up a list of the mem- 
bers. There were thirty-two to start with; thirty-six were initiated 
during the next eight months, giving a total of sixty-eight. 

The membership was cosmopolitan. Perhaps as few as twenty- 
eight were French, thirteen were German or Austrian, nine may have 
been Italian, seven Scandinavian ,. six English, three were from 
Eastern Europe, and two from the Low Countries. French scholars have 
succeeded in identifying many of the names. The Abbe d'Aunillon was 
a writer of bad comedies. Charles J. Baur was a German banker, who 
later served as substitute Grand Master of France in 1744. Bontems 
was valet de chambre of the King of France. Filippo Farsetti was a 
Venitian nobleman, and a connoisseur of art. Claude de Geraudly was 
a dentist at the Royal Court; he wrote a book on the care of the teeth, 
and was an attendant of the Duke of Orleans. Jean-Pierre Guignon was 
the best violinist of the age. Pierre Jeliotte was the greatest tenor 
of the time. Johann Daniel Krafft was a leather-merchant of Hamburg, 
who founded the first lodge in Germany in 1737, and eventually became 
a Grand Treasurer of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Lower Saxony, in 
1743. Thomas Pierre Le Breton was a goldsmith, and "was concurrently 
Master of another Lodge in Paris which worked under an English warrant. 
Prince Lubomirski was Grand Marshal at the court of the King of Poland, 
and a member of the first lodge in Warsaw in 1744. Jacques Christophe 
Naudot was a flautist and minor composer; he wrote a "Masonic March" 
which is still extant. Baron Scheffer was a Swedish diplomat, who 
introduced Freemasonry to his homeland, and served as Grant Master of 
Sweden. The Duke de Villeroy was a favourable courtier of the King 
of France. M. de Wind was the Danish ambassador to France. 

The list goes on and on: Baron de Bousch; Le Chevalier 
Dumont; Count de Gatterburg; Baron de Goertz; le Chevalier de Hastrel; 
Count de Swirby; the two Barons de Wendhausen. Clarly, it was a 
wealthy and aristocratic lodge, with a fair leavening of continental 
nobility, as well as financiers, businessmen, and artists. Even those 
who followed more plebeian trades (such as lapidary, goldsmith, 



- 11 - 

dentist, manservant) moved in the very highest circles. These noble- 
men played a pivotal role in the dissemination of Masonry to northern 
and eastern Europe. 

5. COUSTOS'S LODGE IN LISBON 

Early in 1741 John Coustos went to Portugal, and soon he 
established a Masonic lodge, with himself as Master. In October, 1742 
the lodge was denounced to the Inquisition by a nasty little attorney 
who had a grudge against two of the brethren, and had been primed by 
the wife of another goldsmith. Throughout the month of February 1743, 
the Holy Office gathered information, and then it acted. It arrested 
four of the brethren in March and April. All the files for the case, 
totalling more than 600 pages, are preserved in Lisbon. They are a 
rich mine of information about the membership and proceedures of the 
lodge in Portugal. 

The documents from Coustos 's own dossier were translated 
by Bro. Neville Cryer, and published with a rich commentary by Bro . S. 
Vatcher in the Transactions of Quatuor Coronati Lodge for 1968. The 
papers for the other cases were translated at Bro. Vatcher's behest 
by Bro. Ernest Cromack; I am very grateful to both Brethren for giving 
me access to the translations. 

The lodge had twenty-seven members, all belonging to the 
foreign colony in Lisbon: nineteen Frenchmen, five Englishmen, two 
Dutchmen, and one Italian. Their occupations provide a striking con- 
trast to those of the Paris lodge; not an aristocrat among them. 
Fourteen (over half) were associated with the jewellery trade, as 
goldsmiths, silversmiths, engravers, watchmakers, diamond cutters, or 
the like. Another nine were classified simply as businessmen and 
merchants. There were two tailors, one book-keeper, and one ship's 
captain. 

The Inquisitorial Archives confirm virtually every statement 
made by Coustos: the repeated interrogations, the torture sessions, 
the pressure on him to reveal what he knew about Masonry, his refusal 
to turn Catholic. 

There is one difference, an important one. According to the 
Inquisitorial Archives, the very first time he was brought before the 
Tribunal, five days after his arrest, Coustos made a full confession, 
a full disclosure of the nature of Masonry, as it was in his time - 
the arrangement of the lodge, the modes of recognition, the penalties 
of his obligation, the method of initiation, the procedure at the 
banquet. All there! It's the fullest description we have of the way 
in which Masonry was conducted in the 1740 's. Coustos sang like a 
canary, and before they even laid a hand on him. And the irony of it 
is that they didn't believe he'd told it all! That ' s why he was 
tortured. 

6. MASONIC PRACTICES IN LISBON 

The other members of his lodge also gave full reports to the 
Inquisition. Let me quote from Bro. Cromack's translation of the 
testimony of Jean Baptiste Richard: 

"... The Grand Master made a long speech...., telling him 
many things ... which he no longer remembers.... The first thing 
brought to his attention was the inviolable secrecy to be observed 
in everything, never revealing or disclosing anything whatsoever..., 
either by word of mouth, by writing, or even by drawing ,... under the 
penalty ... of having his head cut off, his heart torn out, his body 



- 12 - 

reduced into pieces and burned, and his ashes thrown into the sea.' 
And this oath having been taken, the Grand Master told him to come 
closer, saying that he wished to teach him the signs by which he 
could be known among his companions. And rising to his feet, he 
opened his hand and passed one side of it over the throat,... and 
after this he took hold of his hand as though in greeting, pressing 
with his thumb on the first joint... of the index finger, and coming 
close to his ear he said the word ' Jachim' . . . . The signs by which 
they were to be known as (Fellows) . . . (consisted) of first placing 
the hand on the breast and approaching the person to whom he wished 
to make himself known, then clasping his hand and pressing with his 
thumb on the first joint of the middle finger, and saying in his ear 
the word Boos.... The Grand Master began to teach him the signs by 
which he would make himself known as a Master.... The first thing he 
had to do was to put the open hand in the middle of the chest with 
the end of the fingers turned upwards and the thumb alongside the 
said chest; then he had to take the hand of the other in such a way 
that the finger ends were touching and pressing on the other's wrist, 
at the same time bringing the point of the right foot, and also the 
knee, one to the other, embracing each other in this position and 
whispering in the ear the following word, Maquibina. . . " (Ferrer, 
volume 2, pages 414-416). 

It is interesting to compare the details for this testimony 
with the British Early Masonic Catechisms, the Early French Exposures, 
and with the procedures followed in the Irish lodges in Lisbon in 
1738. The discussion which follows owes much to the guidance and help 
of Bro. Harry Carr. 

7. AFFINITIES OF COUSTOS'S MASONRY 

Evidently many of the procedures in lodge were uniform 
throughout Europe. We need hardly set forth the evidence in full. 
Suffice it to notice a few features which were universally observed, 
and to point out certain others which had local variations. 

No matter whether in Portugal, England or France, the system 
of three degrees was in general use. The candidate for Initiation was 
deprived of all metal, blindfolded", and his knee was made bare. He 
sought admission by three knocks at the door. Inside the lodge room, 
the table was set with three candles, which represented the sun, the 
moon, and Master of the Lodge. For his obligation, the candidate was 
made to kneel, with one hand resting on the Bible, and with the other 
extending the compasses to his naked left breast. Then he swore to 
keep secrecy, under a multiple penalty. 

In all three countries the lodge room was equipped with the 
representation of a staircase, of seven steps, and perhaps also with 
a blazing star, bearing in its centre the letter G. If a brother 
wanted to give warning that non-Mason was present, he would say the 
words, "It rains." 

Probably the various lodges were equally uniform in other 
portions of the ceremonies; but the English catechisms do not 
describe actions in sufficient detail to enable us to compare them 
with the French and Portuguese narrative sources. 

But, to set against this uniformity, other details exhibit 
local variations. 

Circumambulation : When the candidate was admitted, in 
London he was led once around the lodge before being presented to 
the Master. In Paris, on the other hand, he was "made to take three 



- 13 - 

turns in the Chamber." In Lisbon, as one of Coustos' members told 
the Inquisitors, the guide "made him go three times round the room 
close to the walls, guiding him for this purpose because his eyes 
were covered." 

Posture during Obligation . In London in 1730, the candi- 
date is said to kneel on one knee. In Paris, the posture was more 
awkward: "... The Candidate, though kneeling on his right knee, 
must have his left foot in the air." The same position was also used 
in Coustos's lodge, according to the testimony of one of his 
brethren: "...he (the confessor) with his hand on the book in front 
of which he was kneeling on his right knee with his left in the air, 
promised so to keep it...." 

Where the candidate kneels . In England the candidate is 
frequently described as kneeling on the ground between the arms of a 
square. In France, he regularly kneels on a stool. Coustos says that 
he kneels "upon an instrument like a Mason's square." Two other 
members of Coustos's lodge, Brusle and Richard, reported that they had 
been made to kneel on a piece of white leather which was placed on the 
floor, and which was later given to them as an apron. 

The Apron Charge . Prichard speaks of "that Badge of Honour, 
which (as they term it) is" more ancient and more honourable than is the 
Star and Garter...." This is not found in French sources, except for 
a single one which is based explicitly on Prichard. In connection 
with the Investiture, Coustos use-s the words, "more noble than the 
order of the Golden Fleece, of the Holy Spirit, of Christ, and of all 
others in the World." This sounds as if it might be a local adaptation 
of the same charge. 

Gloves . From 1599 on, it had been a regular custom in 
British Masonry that each initiate, as part of his admission fee, 
should furnish a pair of gloves to every member of the lodge. The 
custom was observed in the Lisbon Lodge in 1738. In the Paris Lodges, 
on the other hand, the initiate was the recipient rather than the 
donor of gloves, and a gesture of gallantry was included. "...He is 
given ... a pair of men's Gloves for himself, and another (pair of) 
ladies' Gloves, for her whom he esteems the most." This was the prac- 
tice in Coustos's lodge in Lisbon. 

The Words of the First two Degrees . In Prichard's Masonry- 
Dissected , the E.A. had two pillar words, while the F.C. used one of 
them. At some date about 1739, we are told, Grand Lodge arbitrarily 
decreed that the word for the First Degree should be the one formerly 
used for the F.C, and that the other word should be used for the 
Second Degree. This change is reflected regularly in France, from 
1742 on, and in Lisbon, in both the Irish Lodge of 1738, and in 
Coustos's Lodge of 1743. 

The Legend of the Third Degree . The Principal Architect of 
the Temple is called "Hiram" by Prichard and the earlier French ex- 
posures based on him. From 1744 on, the French texts regularly name 
him "Adoniram." Coustos uses the earlier form. 

When the architect disappeared, he was missed the same day, 
according to Prichard. From 1738 on, the French exposures say that 
his absence was noted on the seventh day. Coustos says, "after three 
days." 

In Prichard's book, and in the French text derived from it, 
fifteen loving brethren were sent to search for the architect, but 
from 1744 on, the French exposures describe the seekers as nine 



, 14 - 

Masters. Coustos says "fifteen Fellow Crafts." According to Prichard, 
the brethren agreed that they should adopt a substitute Master's Word 
only if they did not find the former word on the Architect's person. 
In the French sources, beginning in 1744, they agreed to take a new 
word as a precaution in case the Architect had been forced to reveal 
the former one. Coustos is closer to Prichard's version. 

The Master's Word . For the Master's Word, the range of 
variant forms is large, but it appears that they all go back to two 
different words which were used in the first half of the eighteenth 
century. One of them occurs in the earlier English catechisms, and 
was also used in the Irish Lodge in Lisbon. The other word appears 
first in Prichard's Masonry Dissected , is regularly found in the 
French sources, and was used in Coustos 's lodge in Lisbon. 

Masonic Fire . In connection with the banquet Coustos de- 
scribes the military precision with which the brethren drank toasts, 
raising their glasses aloft, and conveying them three times to their 
faces. The early English sources have nothing comparable, but it 
sounds like the French procedures from 1737 on: "they drink to the 
health of the Brother, carrying the glass to the mouth in three move- 
ments." "There is no Military Academy where the drill is performed 
with greater exactitude." 

In general, the Masonic ritual of Coustos 's lodge in 
Portugal was perfectly orthodox, and coincides with that known from 
England and France. The few details which are explicitly traceable to 
one or the other suggest that Lisbon practice was eclectic. In a few 
features it followed the English tradition (kneeling on the Square, 
the Apron Charge, details of the Hiramic legend); in more details it 
followed the French (triple circumambulation , the posture during the 
obligation, the Words, the presentation of gloves, Masonic Fire); 
occasionally it struck off on its own (the day when the absence of the 
Architect was noted). It is puzzling to note that occasionally 
Coustos 's testimony differs from that given by other members of his 
lodge (for example, where the candidate kneels). In the few instances 
where we have grounds to judge, it looks as if there was no continuity 
between the earlier lodge in Lisbon and Coustos 's Lodge (the presenta- 
tion of gloves, the Master's Word). 

8. WHEN WAS HIS BOOK PUBLISHED? 

The Sufferings of John Coustos bears on its title page the 
imprint, "London: Printed by W. Strahan, for the Author; 1746." That 
was a tempestuous year, and it is of some interest to ascertain the 
exact date of publication. Fortunately we can trace the process in a 
series of notices in The Daily Advertiser of London. On March 2, 1745 
it announced the impending publication of a book on The Sufferings of 
John Coustos and invited advance subscriptions. On August 1, Coustos 
begged leave to inform the subscribers "that the Publication.... has 
been retarded by the Engraver's not being able to finish the Plates at 
the Time propos'd/. ." On October 9 he advertised that the book would 
soon be delivered to the subscribers. And on December 23, 1745, the 
paper announced "This Day is publish' d ... . The Sufferings of John 
Coustos." Perhaps as Bro. Hamill has suggested to me, the printer set 
the date "1746" on the title page, in the expectation that publication 
would take place after January 1. As it happened, it was nine days 
earlier. Now we can sketch the background for the book. 



- 15 - 

9. THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

The year was 1745. The British throne was held by George II 
of the House of Hanover, sixty-two years of age, stupid, graceless, 
and Protestant; "snuffy old drone from the German hive," as Justice 
Oliver Wendell Holmes called him. On the continent of Europe, Great 
Britain was fighting the War of the Austrian Succession. Bonnie 
Prince Charlie, twenty-four years old, clever, fascinating, and 
Catholic, had landed in Scotland on July 23, and raised the Jacobite 
standard of rebellion. He routed Johnnie Cope at Prestonpans (Sep- 
tember 21), and marched south into England, reaching Derby, a scant 
120 miles from London, on December 4. 

The English countered with the pen as well as the sword. The 
newspapers declaimed a litany of hatred against the Stuarts, and their 
Scots Highlander and Roman Catholic supporters. 

". . . But (for God's sake) shall we seek Liberty amongst 
a lawless Rabble, the mountainous Men of the North, Men 
who from the Situation of their Country have all their 
Days been addicted to Rapine and Plunder? Who are as 
ignorant of the right Use of that glorious Blessing 
(Liberty) as brute Beasts, and like them live only in 
the Abuse of it? Surely no! We are not so far degenerated. 
Next let us consider whom they assist: The merciless 
Sons of Rome, who will be so far from restraining their 
Fury, that they will exceed them in Cruelty, in 
Tyranny, in Oppression, and in every lawless Act, to all 
those who differ from them in Points of Religion, or 
in Notions of Liberty. Yet these are to be your mighty 
Deliverers, Britons!" (The Daily Advertiser , London, 
October 11, 1745) . 

As early as September 7 a proclamation was issued "command- 
ing all Papists, and reputed Papists, to depart from the Cities of 
London and Westminster, and from within ten Miles of the same; and... 
confining Papists, and reputed Papists, to their Habitations." Pre- 
sumably the authorities were afraid that they would betray London to 
the invader. Printing presses flooded the country with shrill anti- 
Romanist propaganda, all duly heralded in the London journals: A 
Faithful Portrait of Popery, by which it is seen to be the Reverse of 
Christianity , by William Warburton; The Papists bloody Oath of SecreTy , 
by Robert Bolton; The bloody Cruelties of the Papists against the 
Protestants , by "D.W . " ; The Opposition between Christianity and Popery ; 
Popery Inconsistent with Reason, Liberty, and Christianity 7 ; and dozens 
of others . 

In short, Coustos's pathetic tale of his misfortunes became 
yet another shell-burst in the barrage of anti- Jacobite propaganda. 

10. OTHER EDITIONS 

There was also a French edition of the book, entitled 
Procedures curieuses or, in translation, "Extraordinary Procedures of 
The Inquisition in Portugal against the Free-Masons." At this period 
all books printed in France had to be licensed by The Government. 
Those published without official sanction generally bore a fictitious 
imprint, and this one was date-lined "In the Valley of Jehoshaphat : 
In the Year of the Foundation of Solomon's Temple, 2803." Standard 
authorities have been at some pains to ascertain the true date. 
Wolfstieg says, "The Hague, 1747;" Professor Ferrer Benimeli says, 
"1753;" the British Museum Catalogue says, "Hamburg, 1756." We can 
now say that all these conjectures are too late; publication of the 



- 16 - 

book is reported in The Daily Advertiser for Friday, January 31, 1746. 
Evidently it was printed very early in 1746 or even in 1745. In fact 
it seems likely that it was the original text, and the English version 
was simply a translation. There are several indications, but one will 
suffice. The French text gives the Loyal Toast, quoted from 
Anderson's Constitution s of 1723: "Dieu benisse le Roi et le Metier" 
("God bless the King aricT the Craft"). In the English version, this 
is rendered, "God preserve the King and the Brotherhood." The French 
version is closer to the original, and the English translation was 
evidently made by a non-Masons. 

After the French and the first English editions, the book was 

regularly reprinted. Twenty-seven editions are known to me: one 

French, ten British, three German, and thirteen American (the earliest 
being 1797) . 

11. CONCLUDING REMARKS 

Well, now, what do we learn from all this? Two things, as 
it seems to me. First, that there are still some interesting Masonic 
stories lurking about for us to root out. And secondly, that perhaps 
we shouldn't make snap judgements. It is tempting, and easy, to con- 
demn the Catholic Church for torturing Coustos as a Mason. But torture 
and harsh punishment were still the custom of the time, sometimes for 
what seem to us trivial offences. In 1772 a boy named Peter M'Cloud 
was hanged in London for an attempt at housebreaking which failed so 
that he was caught. In 1789 a woman by the name of Christian Murphy 
was burnt at the Stake in London for counterfeiting. In France in 
1757, Robert Francois Damiens , who had tried unsuccessfuly to kill the 
King, had his hand burnt, his body pinched with red hot pinchers; 
boiling oil, melted wax and rosin, and melted lead were poured into 
all his wounds, and then he was torn asunder by four horses. A turn 
or two on the rack seems mild enough in comparison. 

And what about the Charge of Masonry? Well, the Craft had 
been condemned on suspicion of heresy;- that means that in the Church's 
eyes, members were putting their immortal souls in hazard of eternal 
hell-fire. Not something the Church would accept without exerting 
strong efforts for Salvation! What does a little temporary physical 
discomfort count, when measured against the whole of eternity? One 
can even see why Masonry was suspected. It came from a Protestant 
country - a country of heretics; a country of radicals, which had 
killed one king, and driven out another within the course of the pre- 
ceding century. Furthermore, the doors of the lodges were tyled, and 
the members took an oath to keep everything secret that went on. Who 
could say what pagan rites, what vile orgies, what diabolical plots 
were being hatched by this cell of radical heretics! Small wonder the 
Church imagined the worst! 

What then are we to think of Coustos? Contempt is the easy 
first reaction towards a man who so violates the sacred trust reposed 
in him. Yet the Inquisitors had ways (as the saying goes) to loosen 
tongues. They had great powers, they knew how to use them, and they 
saw that people realized the extent of those powers. Arrest by the 
Holy Office was practically as good as a conviction; rare was the 
prisoner who did not confess whatever was wanted of him. The 
officials would take him to the torture chamber,, and show him all the 
instruments so that "he would readily understand how arduous and 
thorough would be his examination." Again and again they would give 
him time by himself, to ponder his situation. He could brood about 
whether he' would rather talk now or later. For talk he certainly 
would. In this century we have seen how effective psychological 
pressure can be when exerted by a powerful institution against an 



- 17 - 

isolated individual. "Brain-washing" has been reduced to a fine art; 
its methods, we see now, are not new. 

Seen in this light, Coustos's capitulation is quite intelligible; 
there is no need to spurn him for his confession, given the extremity 
to which he was reduced. Who of us would be brave enough to endure 
the strappado , or the rack, or even the threat of them, without 
cracking? 

Are we perhaps to see him then as "a simple man, understandably 
cowed by the frightening circumstances in which he found himself"? 
To be sure, he was not well schooled; his great sprawling signature, 
laboriously traced letter by letter, dominates practically every page 
of the minute book at Paris. At one meeting he signed with his rank, 
which he misspelled as "passe Mettre". Simple in one sense, yes. 

But there is more to him than this. His Junior Warden in Lisbon 
told the Holy Office that Coustos was "a very able man, endowed with 
many talents and charm.... He alone was fit to be head of this 
congregation in this Kingdom, because he alone knew the secrets and 
institution of Masonry." Even the aristocrats of Paris willingly 
submitted to his guidance. Consider the lodge minutes of April 30, 
1737, as recorded by the Chevalier de Hastrel. 

"Since an ill-founded slur had been cast on our W. Bro . 
Coustos, that he had not taken the usual Masonic obligation, 
he took it at the hands of Bro. Baur, S.W., and all the 
Brethren who constituted the perfect and regular Lodge; 
even though he had been Master of five lodges in England, 
and though he is the one, so to speak, who brought Masonry 
here, who has kept regular lodge, and established the Order 
on its present footing; since it is from him that we hold 
those admirable Masonic secrets which he possesses to per- 
fection; and we are happy only insofar as we follow his 
instructions faithfully." 

We see the dim portrait of a man whose magnetic personality and 
Masonic skills compelled admiration from his peers, and his betters. 

What of his behaviour before the Tribunal of the Inquisition? 
Overt obedience might seem out of the question. Bro. Jean Baptiste 
Richard "found the way to escape from this Hell by the back door;" 
he turned Catholic. Coustos was made of sterner stuff. "I wish" 
(he told them) "to continue in the Protestant religion in which I 
have lived hitherto, and in which I was nurtured and instructed by 
my parents ." 

When they wanted information, he was not in a position to keep 
silent. Yet did he tell all? Every witness was asked what Masons he 
knew. Mouton catalogued twenty-five. Jean Thomas Brusle named 
eighteen. Lambert Boulanger listed fourteen, and Richard thirteen. 
Coustos contented himself with twelve, of whom two were from other 
lodges. Was the Master so rattled that he forgot the names of half 
his members, even of his two Wardens, Bilhar and Mouton? 

Coustos outlined the Masonic ceremonies of the lodge for the 
Inquisition. He told how the candidate knelt on a Mason's square (a 
practice followed in England in 1730); yet two of his members agreed 
that he knelt on an apron. Did the Master not know how things were 
done in his own lodge? 

Where was he born? He told the Holy Office that he was "Swiss 
by Nationality and born in the canton of Basel." In his book however, 



- 18 - 

he says "I am a native of Berne in Switzerland ." Did the man not 
know? His friend Richard confirms for us that Coustos was "a native 
of the canton of Bern." 

These are puzzling little points, but one explanation suits them 
all. On his release from the Galleys, Coustos speaks like a broken 
man. 

"I have but too much Reason to fear, that I shall feel the sad 
Effects of this Cruelty so long as I live; I buind seiz'd, from 
time to time, with thrilling Pains, with which I never was 
afflicted, till I had the Misfortune of falling into the merciless 
and bloody Hands of the Inquisitors." 

And he dies less than two years after deliverance. But is it possible 
that he was not completely crushed? That he did, after all, keep some- 
thing back from his tormentors? That he -salvaged a vestige of self 
respect by these petty deceptions? Perhaps so. In Coustos we see a 
man who had ruled Masonic lodges in three countries; a man who had won 
the admiration of the lords and barons of Paris; a man who under 
duress had the presence of mind to protect his brethren; a man who, 
though not an accomplished writer, determined to win his revenge by 
telling the world of his sufferings. And he did so with such simpli- 
city, with such wealth of circumstantial detail, that his book seemed 
more like fiction than autobiography. Many could not or would not 
believe. In the late nineteenth century, even his Masonic brethren 
dismissed the work as the product of a fertile imagination. But in 
these last few years, new sources have sustained him. The very re- 
cords of the Inquisition serve to establish the main truth of Coustos' 
narrative . 

His early death at the age of forty-three, within two years of 
deliverance, was undoubtedly hastened by his torture and imprisonment. 
He is worthy to be enshrined among those who give up their lives for a 
principle. Yes, John Coustos was a true Masonic hero. 

Written reviews were presented by R. W. Bro. G. Ivor Davies, W. 
Bro. John E. Brittain. Bro. Raymond Crimklaw's review was presented 
by R. W. Bro. R. E. Groshaw. 

Following an interesting informal discussion, the Worshipful 
Master called on R. W. Bro. McLeod to summarize the discussions and 
present his concluding remarks. 

The following items were placed on display for the benefit of the 
Brethren: 

1. Portrait of John Coustos (from the engraving in the first English 
edition of his book, London, 1746). 

2. Alleged portrait of John Coustos in Masonic costume (from the 
frontispiece to the edition published in Birmingham, 1790). 

3. A page from the Inquisitorial Archives, recording the answers 
Coustos gave when he was asked about his family. 

4. The printed list of persons condemned at the public Auto da Fe of 
June 21, 1744; Coustos' s name stands in second place. 

5. Title-page of one of the later editions of Coustos 's book, 
Sunderland, 1817. 

6. French tracing boards from the time of Coustos (taken from the 
exposure Catechisme des Francs -Macons , 1744. 

7. Page proofs of an article on "John Coustous: His Lodges and his 
Book," to be published in Transactions of Quatuor Coronati Lodge, 



- 19 - 

volume 92. 

8. Page proofs of the Introduction to the Masonic Book Club Reprint 
of Coustos's book, scheduled for publication September 20, 1979. 

CLOSE THE LODGE 

A few brief announcements were presented including an invitation 
from the local arrangements committee to join in refreshments and 
fellowship after the closing of the Lodge. 

The Lodge was closed in harmony at 11:05 PM. 

CEREMONY OF INSTALLATION OF THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER 
AND INVESTITURE OF THE OFFICERS OF THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th, 1979, CAMBRIDGE 



Installing Board 

Installing Master 
Immediate Past Master 
Senior Warden 
Junior Warden 
Director of Ceremonies 

Chaplain 
Secretary- 
Senior Deacon 
Junior Deacon 
Inner Guard 
Tyler 



V. W. Bro 

V. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

V. W. Bro 

W. Bro 

W. Bro 

W. Bro 

W. Bro 



Randall D. Langs 
Jacob (Jack) Pos 
A. N. Newell 
Hal Copeland 
Roy S. Sparrow 

Clare Parsons 
Wm. J. Cowan 
Henry C. Wolfe 
Donald B. Kaufman 
Harvey E. Jones 
Thomas Fost. 



The Work 



Present W. M. -Elect 

Charge to W. M. -Elect 

Ancient Charges 

Obligation (Second Degree) 

Open Board 

Invocation 

Obligation (Board) 

Secret Work 

Install W. M. 

Invest I. P.M. 

Close Board (Short Form) 

W. T. in 3rd, 2nd, lst,D 

Book of C. and Warrant 

Charge at N.E. 



R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn 

I.M. 

Secretary 

R. W. Bro 

I.M. 

R. W. Bro 

V. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

R. W. Bro 

V. W. Bro 

I.M. 

W. Bro. Clyde Bowman 

R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn 

R. W. Bro. John Woodburn 



Fred Bowery 

Clare Parsons 
Jack Pos 
Don Sandison 
Wm. S. McVittie 
Jack Pos 



Investiture of Officers 

Senior Warden R. 

Junior Warden(W. Bro. G.E.Zwicker) R. 

Charge to the Wardens R. 

Chaplain(Bro. Rev. G. Rivers) R. 

Treasurer (R.W. Bro. W.E. Wilson) V. 

Secretary (V.W. Bro. J. Pos) R. 

Asst. Sec'y.(W. Bro. Jos. J. Vliehs) R. 
Senior Deacon (W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley) 
Junior Deacon(R.W. Bro . D.C. Bradley) 

Dir. Ceremonies (R.W. Bro. R.S. Sparrow) R. 

Sr. Steward(R.W. Bro. Robt. Throop) R. 

Jr. Steward(W. Bro. J.E. Brittain) R. 
Organist (R.W. Bro. L.R. Hertel) 
Inner Guard (R.W. Bro. C.E. Drew) 



W. Bro. A. N. Newell 

W. Bro. Hal Copeland 

W. Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

W. Bro. Clare Parsons 

W. Bro. Robt. McMaster 

W. Bro. W. E. Wilson 

W. Bro. W. E. Wilson 

W. Bro. H. C. Wolfe 

W. Bro. H. C. Wolfe 

W. Bro. Wm. Wells 

W. Bro. Wm. Wells 

W. Bro. Wm. Wells 

W. Bro. D. B. Kaufman 

W. Bro. H. E. Jones 



- 20 - 

Historian (Bro. B. D. Stapley) R. W. Bro. K.R.A. Flynn 

Tyler(R.W.Bro. C.F. Grimwood) R. W. Bro. Wm. S. McVittie 

COMING EVENTS 

NOVEMBER 21st, 1979 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge. Annual Installation of the Worshipful Master and the 
Investiture of the Officers. Also, W. Bro. Greg C. Robinson will 
present a paper titled "Morgan - The Canadian Connection." Re- 
views will be presented by V. W. Bro. Lawrence Runnals; W. Bros. 
George Campbell and Donald K. Gorman; and Bro. Glen T. Jones. 

MARCH 19th, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge, 
and Official visit of R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn, District Deputy 
Grand Master of Waterloo District. Also, R. W. Bro. Charles A. 
Sankey will present a paper which will be a condensation of Albert 
Pike's Papers on the First Three Degrees of Masonry. 

MAY 21st, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 

Bro. John E. Taylor will present a paper titled "The Lodge Room, 
Lodge Furniture, Regalia and other Masonic Matters." Bro. Taylor 
is a recipient of the coveted William Mercer Wilson Medal and the 
first person to receive it for academic contribution to Masonic 
Research. 

Other Masonic Papers to be presented at future meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for example: 
Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, Rosicrucians , 
Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges formerly 
on the Register and now struck off, by Bro. John E. Taylor. 

3. A Review of important similarities of our Grand Masters, by V. W. 
Bros. L. Runnals and W. Bro. George Campbell. 

4. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 

5. An up to date review of Masonic Research Lodges. 

6. The Masonic Career? of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian 
Chief by V. W. Bro. J. Pos . 

NOTE: 

1. If any Brother has any suggestions for titles for masonic papers, 
or who would like to prepare or review a paper for presentation 
in the Lodge, please contact the Editor of the Proceedings, or 
the Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Information. 

2. Any Brother who has a spare copy of J. Ross Robertson's "The 
History of Freemasonry in Canada", Volume II, and Robert Freke 
Gould's "The History of Freemasonry", Volume I, 2, 3 and 4, 
1886 (Leather Bound) please contact V. W. Bro. J. Pos, Editor 
of Proceedings. 



- 21 - 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT 

Dear Brethren: 

One of the major concerns since the formation of the Lodge, and 
one that might have been predicted by the very nature of our objec- 
tives, particularly in the early development of the Lodge, is the 
late hour of our meetings. There are other concerns as well and your 
executive is most anxious to hear your comments and to learn of your 
recommendations. The following comments are presented to encourage 
your response, either by letters to the Editor or in open discussion. 

The establishment of working committees was an attempt to reduce 
the amount of time spent on discussions of detail at the Regular 
Meeting. It was the desire of the program planners, that ideas and 
proposals would have been discussed in Committee and that after 
careful review and much thought and planning, well defined proposals 
and recommendations would have been presented to the Committee on 
General Purposes where further refinement would have made it possible 
to. present, to the members in open lodge, well prepared, clearly 
defined and couched in concise wording, new suggestions, concepts and 
matters of concern for the future development of the Lodge and its 
contribution to Freemasonry in the Grand Jurisdiction. 

Unfortunately, this is not happening and we must answer the 
question, why not? Perhaps the procedure outlined is not the most 
desirable or workable for our particular lodge? Are the objectives 
and terms of reference, as recorded in the Lodge By-Laws, not clearly 
defined for the various Standing and Appointed Committees? Is there 
a better structure or more functional procedure that should be con- 
sidered or adopted? What about the composition of the Committees, 
are they being challenged, are we providing a suitable channel for 
communication within committees and between committees. These are 
a few of the questions that come to mind, no doubt each of you could 
add to the list; but questions are not the only concern. What we 
really need is answers to solve the problems that should be of 
concern to every member of the Lodge. 

In retrospect, we have made some errors and I share the responsi 
bility. In the beginning, we formed committees around a nucleus of 
very interested, prominent and in many instances, very active masons 
frequently with other demanding responsibilities. These selections 
may have been justifiable in the early development of this unique 
Lodge. But, as we are now rapidly approaching a membership of 300, 
which we hope will continue to grow, there must now be considerable 
fresh talent available for cultivation and exploitation to insure 
the viability of a lasting future. 

Perhaps there are too many members serving dual roles on more 
than one committee with detrimental effects. In the first place, 
it is not fair to the Brethren with double responsibilities to 
continue to impose on their time; we are certainly most grateful 
for their initial contribution in establishing a working foundation. 
Nor is it fair to the Lodge and its potential usefulness to the 
Craft if the Committees are allowed to rusticate with inactivity. 

Are the Committees or their respective titles appropriate for 
the Purpose and Objectives of the Lodge as defined in the Lodge By- 
Laws (Article III, Sec. 1-7)? Perhaps a restructuring or a new 
method of operation is in order? Currently, we function as a Lodge 
on the basis of four Regular Meetings and from three to four Meetings 
of the Committee on General Purposes with very poor attendance at the 
latter. 



- 22 - 

At each of the Regular Meetings, we feature the presentation of 
a Paper by a prominent Masonic Scholar, complete with formal reviews 
and an informal discussion. Then we add the Regular Lodge Reviews 
to the beginning of the Agenda, the meetings are extending into the 
late hours of the evening. (We should be out of the Lodge Room 
before 10:30 P>!) . Calling on the Guest Speaker at a late hour is 
not conducive to active participation by the membership, nor does it 
provide a challenging and stimulating environment for those present- 
ing papers or those participating in the reviews. Our Speakers have 
been most kind and tolerant in this respect, but we must resolve 
now before it is too late, not to impose on them in this manner any 
longer or we shall quickly displace an otherwise desirable image of 
our Lodge Meetings with one that is far from complimentary. 

Every effort is being made to reduce the length of our November 
meeting. The Business Portion is being stripped to its barest 
essentials with no Committee Reports. "V. W. Bro . Langs is endeavor- 
ing to conduct the Installation Ceremony with decorum and dispatch 
leaving as much time as possible for W. Bro. Greg Robinson for the 
presentation of his paper titled "Morgan - The Canadian Connection." 
In order to derive the greatest benefit from the Ceremony of 
Installation and Investiture of the Officers, perhaps we should 
dispense with an invited paper on that occasion? 

In order to be constructive, and assuming that you may in some 
measure agree with several of the foregoing comments and further, 
that there may be some merit in modifying the structure or operation 
of the Lodge, I request that you give some thought to the following 
propositions : 

1. Re-organize the Committees of the Lodge to obtain more activity 
within the committees and to obtain greater lodge participation 
without duplication. 

2. That we replace the current . practice of four General Purpose 
Committee Meetings, by adding three more Regular Meetings with 
no invited papers. 

3. That we program invited papers, panel discussions, historical 
instruction, special events or other projects for three of the 
current four Regular Meetings leaving the Installation and 
Investiture Ceremonies in November, free of conflict with other 
activities . 

4. That the starting time of the three Regular Meetings to discuss 
General Business be set back tc 8:00 PM. Thereby allowing time 
before the meeting for Lodge Committees to insure that their 
respective information has been adequately discussed and 
suitably abbreviated for presentation at the Regular Meeting. 

In summary, the annual meeting schedule may appear as follows: 

September - ":00 PM Committee Meetings 

S:00 PM Regular Meetings - General Business 

October - ":30 PM Regular Meeting - Essential Business 

Paper Presentation or other Program 

November - ":00 PM Committee Meetings 

S:00 PM Regular Meeting - General Business 

Installation and Investiture of Officers 



23 - 



March 


- 7:30 PM 


April 


- 7:00 PM 
8:00 PM 


May 


- 7:30 PM 



Regular Meeting - Essential Business 
Paper Presentation or other Program 

Committee Meetings 
Regular Meeting - General Business 
Inter-lodge visitation, Waterloo 
District 

Regular Meeting - Essential Business 
Paper Presentation or other Program 




- 24 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 
M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 
M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn 

75 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1978-79 



W.M. R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn 

I. P.M. V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

S.W. R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 

S.D. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker 

J.D. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

I.G. R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley 

S.S. R.W.Bro. Charles Edwin Drew 

J.S. V.W.Bro. Robert Carpenter 

COMMITTEES 



Tyler R.W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie 
Sec'y W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 
A/Sec'y W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs 
Treas. R.W.Bro. W. E. Wilson 
D.C. R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 
Chap. Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 
Organist R.W.Bro. L.R. Hertel 
Historian Bro. B. D. Stapley 

FOR 1978-79 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, (S.W.); all 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION $ TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, (J .W. ) 
W.Bro. George Zwicker, (S.D.); and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

MEMBERSHIP $ UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W.Bro. 
George Zwicker, (S.D.); V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. Bert 
Mennie; and R.W.Bro. Robert Throop . 

REFRESHMENT $ ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, (S.S.); 
V.W.Bro. Robert Carpenter, (J.S.); Local Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. Wm. S. 
McVittie, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell; R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce; and V.W. Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; and R.W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce; R.W.Bro. James Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. 
Ronald Groshaw; V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos; W.Bro. Paul Engel; and Bro. 
Kenneth Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 
Steen; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey . 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears after a Brother's name, this is 
an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge By-Laws. The 
duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in Article VIII, 
Sections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for an annual budget. 



$)roceei)ingg 



Gtfje Heritage HobgeJ&o.730 



&.$.&®.w., «.».c 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Donald G. S. Grinton 
28 Cambridge Dr. 
Brantford, 5 Ontario 
N3R 5E2 
(519) 759-3182 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 218 

(519) 821-4995 



Vol. 03. No. 02 



Cambridge. Ontario. Canada 



January. 198Q 



This Bulleting includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting 
and subsequent General Purpose Committee Meeting; Proceedings of the 
Eleventh Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, November 21st, 1979; 
Installation and Investitute Ceremonies; and notice of coming events. 

PLEASE NOTE: The opinions expressed by the authors and reviewers in 
these Proceedings are not necessarily those of the 
Lodge or its members. 

SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By direction from the Worshipful Master, you are 
to attend the Twelfth Regular Meeting of the Lodge to 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple located at the North-E 
the intersection of Highways No. 401 and No. 24 on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 19th, 1980, at 7:30 PM 



hereby requested 
be held in the 
ast corner of 



prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting 
may be regularly brought before the Lodge. This is al 
of the Official visit of the District Deputy Grand Mas 
District, R. W. Bro . LewisHahn. 

R. W. Bro. Charles A. Sankey will present a paper 
Overview of Old Scottish Rite Degrees" (these have nev 
ferred by an English speaking Supreme Council). Writt 
W. Bro. J. W. Forbes, P. M. of Corinthian Lodge No. 51 
Chancellor of Supreme Council, Ancient and Accepted Sco 
Freemasonry of Canada; and W. Bro. B. A. Mennie, P. M. 
Lodge No. 144, and Charter Member of The Heritage Lodg 

GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 



such business as 
so the occasion 
ter' of Waterloo 

titled "An 
er been con- 
en reviews by 
3, P. Grand, 
ttish Rite of 

Tecumseh 
e No. 730. 



The General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held on 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, 1980, at 7:30 PM. 

In Addition to the Regular Business of the Lodge, Reports will 
be presented by all Committee Chairmen (Chairmen, please present 
written reports of your Committee Activities, as well as your future 
plans). A special report is being prepared by V. W. Bro. Randall 
Langs and his Committee concerning an alternate meeting night for our 



Regular Meetings. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Lodge Committees 
are expected to attend. All Lodge Members are particularly welcome. 

Fraternally yours, 

V.W. Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 
Secretary 

PROCEEDINGS 

The Eleventh Regular Meeting of the Heritage Lodge No. 7.30 was 
held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, 
November 21st, 1979, with 12 Officers, 38 Members and 41 Visitors 
for a total of 91 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:42 PM with Wor- 
shipful Master, R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn in the East. R. W. Bro. 
Flynn welcomed the Brethren and then called on R. W. Bro. Roy 
Sparrow, Director of Ceremonies to admit the visitors. 

VISITORS 

A number of Worshipful Masters from Waterloo and surrounding 
Districts were admitted accompanied by Brethren Past Masters and 
Past Grand Lodge Officers to be welcomed by the Worshipful Master. 

The Director of Ceremonies was again admitted to present R. 
W. Bro. Lewis Hahn, District Deputy Grand Master of Waterloo District, 
accompanied by 8 present Grand Lodge Officers. The Brethren were 
honourably received and invited to join the Worshipful Master in the 
East. After accepting the gavel, R. W. Bro. Hahn thanked the Lodge 
and its visitors for such a gracious welcome and returned the gavel 
to the Worshipful Master; who called on the Chaplain to attend the 
Altar. 

AT THE ALTAR 

Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers approached the altar: As we approach ano- 
ther Installation and Investitute, let us hear what St. Paul has to 
say to the Hebrew People: (Hebrews 13) 

"Never let your brotherly love fail, nor neglect to extend 
your hospitality to strangers - sometimes men have entertained angels 
unawares .. .Obey your rulers and recognize their authority. They are 
like men standing guard over your spiritual good, and they have great 
responsibility. Try to make their work a pleasure and not a burden - 
by so doing you will help not only them but yourselves as well". 

(J. B. Phillips Translation) 

LET US PRAY 

Gracious and Eternal God, who has inspired men in every genera- 
tion with wisdom, and given them talents of leadership: we would 
pause in these moments of quietness to give thanks for those of our 
own time who have chosen to use their special gifts in the establish- 
ment and conduct of this unique Lodge. May your Holy Spirit continue 
to rest upon those about to be charged with the direction of this 
Lodge so that they, and all our Brethren together, may find its work 
a pleasure and not a burden, but most of all a means of more fully 
establishing those qualities of life which come to us from your Most 
Holy Word. Amen - SO MOTE IT BE. 



3 - 



MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Donald Grinton, seconded by 
R. W. Bro. Ronald Groshaw, that the minutes of the Tenth Regular 
Meeting, held on Wednesday, September 19th, 1979, be adopted as cir- 
culated in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 01, October, 1979. 
Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The Reports of Committees on the Applications for Affiliation, 
which were listed in the Proceedings (Vol. 3, No. 1, dated October, 
1979, all reported favourable. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W. Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by R. 
W. Bro. C. E. Drew, that the reports be received, the Committees 
discharged and the Applications balloted upon. Carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

A letter was received from Bro. Lile Louis Burton, of 1092 
Dunnegan St., Woodstock, requesting a demit from the Lodge. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W. Bro. Joe Vliehs, seconded by Bro. 
Rev. Gray Rivers, that the correspondence from Bro. Burton be held 
over for General Business. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $1,251.16 were presented, and 
on a motion by W. Bro. Balfour Le Gresley, seconded by R. W. Bro. C. 
E. Drew, were passed and ordered paid: 

Secretary's Account: 

- Postage up to November 21st, 1979 

- Post Office deposit account, Inv. Nos. 842,1090,1107 
Dominion Regalia, (Officers collars, and jewels) 

- Inv. Nos. 18207, 18329 
334 Office Services (Typing Sept. Proceedings) 

- Inv. Nos. 9684, 9691 
Kopy Print: 

- 400 copies Sept. Proceedings, Inv. No. 4919 

- 500 copies, information leaflet, Inv. No. 4953 
Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corp., 

- Temple rent 1979/1980 
W. Bro. Donald Kaufman, Refreshments (November meeting) 

TOTAL 

* - Most of this money has already been donated by the first Officers 
of the Lodge. 



$ 19. 


,26 


40. 


,33 


543, 


,56* 


24, 


,25 


149, 


,40 


54, 


,84 


400, 


,00 


19. 


,52 


$1,251.16 



- 4 - 



RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation, were received from the following: 

1. EMERICK, Donald James, D.D.G.M.; 506 George St., Sarnia, Ontario; 
age 35; Salesman; Member of Otisippi Lodge No. 719, G.R.C.; re- 
commended by R. W. Bro. Wm. S. McVittie and R. W. Bro. John Wood- 
burn. 

2. FREER, Burton Stanley, P.D.D.G.M.; RR#6 Cambridge, Ontario; Age 
64; Layout Developer; Member of Gait Lodge No. 257, G.R.C.; re- 
commended by R. W. Bro. Charles F. Grimwood and Bro. Rev. Gray 
Rivers. 

3. AGGERHOLM, Aksel, P.D.D.G.M.; 825 North Service Rd. , Mississauga, 
Ontario; age 53; Operation Manager; Member of Stanley Lodge No. 
426, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W. Bro. J. W. Gerrard and W. Bro. 

E. J. B. Anderson. 

4. BROOK, William John, P.G.S.; 808-176 Vidal Street, S. , Sarnia, 
Ontario; Age 61; Rental Clerk; Member of St. Paul Lodge No. 601, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R. W. Bro. Wm. S. McVittie and R. W. Bro. 
R. E. Groshaw. 

5. SEENS, F. Harland, P.M.; P. 0. Bailieboro, Ontario; age 65; Sales 
Manager; Member of J. B. Hall Lodge No. 145, G.R.C.; recommended 
by W. Bro. George E. Zwicker and Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers. 

6. MARTY, Jchr. Kenneth, P.M.; 114 Lovers Lane, Ancaster, Ontario; 
age 78; Retired Druggist; Member of New Dominion Lodge No. 205, 
G.R.C.; recommended "by R. W. Bro. Ray S. Sparrow and R. W. Bro. 
Donald Grinton. 

7. FERGUSON, Leverne, P.M.; 46 Stannes PI., St. Thomas, Ontario; 
Age 68; Retired; Member of St. David's Lodge No. 302, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R. W. Brother Roy S. Sparrow and R. W. Bro. Wm. 
A. Isbister. 

8. JACKSON, George Robert, P.M.; 68 Balaclava St., St. Thomas, 
Ontario; age 61; retired; Member of St. David's Lodge No. 302, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R. W. Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw and R. W. 
Bro. Wm. A. Isbister. 

9. GERHART, Eugene Charlton, M.M. ; Box 482, 11 Brenda Ave., Parry 
Sound, Ontario; Age 60; Barrister; Member of Granite Lodge No. 
352, G.R.C.; recommended by W. Bro. Wm. T. Boratynee and Bro. 
W. J. Boston. 

10. BOERSMA, Johan M. , M.M. ; 301 Dixon Road., Weston, Ontario; age 
54; Money Market Trader; Member of Occident Lodge No. 346, G.R.C. 
recommended by R. W. Bro. Wallace E. McLeod and R. W. Bro. John 
Woodburn. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. Donald S. Grinton, seconded 
by W. Bro. George E. Zwicker, that the Applications be received and 
the usual committees appointed. Carried. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

In accordance with the notice of motion as published on page 5, 
October 1979, Proceedings, Vol. 3, No. 1, 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro . Charles F. Grimwood, second- 
ed by R. W. Bro. A. H. Copeland, that the By-Laws of the Heritage 
Lodge, No. 730 be amended to accommodate the Office of Historian as 
an Officer of the Heritage Lodge No. 730 and to give suitable terms 
of reference as follows: 

Article V... Officers - Part 1 - Insert 'Historian after Organist 1 

Article VI... Duties of Officers - Part 16 - Delete (Not an Officer) 

Motion Carried. 

With regard to the letter of resignation (see correspondence), 
the secretary was instructed to correspond with the applicant and 
abide by his wishes. 

BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by R. W. Bro. C. E. Drew, seconded by W. 
Bro. Donald Kaufman, that the Ballot be taken collectively. Carried. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applicants, the Worshipful 
Master declared: R. W. Bros. A. Lou Copeland, Donald L, Sandison; 
W. Bros. William G. Bodley, David Coupar, Ralph Eldred Gardiner and 
Bro. George Valentine Harvey eligible for membership in The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, and requested that they affix their signatures in our 
Register in token of their submission to the Lodge By-Laws. 

INSTALLATION AND INVESTITURE 

This being the occasion of the Installation of the Worshipful 
Master and the Investiture of the Officers, the Lodge was called from 
L. to R. for the space of 10 minutes and back to L. at 8:30 PM. 

At this time, R. W. Bro. Keith Flynn called on V. W. Bro. Randall 
Langs to accept the gavel and proceed with the Ceremony. V. W. Bro. 
Langs then called on the members .of the Installing Board to assume 
their respective places, and then proceeded with an efficient and 
dignified ceremony, which was concluded by 10:05 PM at which time R. 
W. Bro. Lewis Hahn proclaimed the following officers, with the ex- 
ception of J.D., J.S. and Historian legally and duly installed and 
invested: 

W.M. R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton Tyler R.W.Bro. Charles F. Grimwood 

I. P.M. R.W.Bro. Keith R. A. Flynn Sec'y. V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

S.W. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw A/Sec'y. W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs 

J.W. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker Treas. R.W.Bro. W. E. Wilson 

S.D. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley D.C. R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

S.S. R.W.Bro. Robert Throop Chaplain Bro. Rev. W. G. Rivers 

I.G. R.W.Bro. C. Ed. Drew Organist R.W.Bro. Len R. Hertel 

Sincere appreciation was extended to V. W. Bro. Randall Langs, 
Installing Master and to the Brethren who participated in the Cere- 
monies by R. W. Bro. Ronald Groshaw, seconded by W. Bro. George 
Zwicker and supported by the applause of the Brethren. 

R. W. Bro. Donald Grinton, the newly installed Worshipful Master 
also thanked all those who had assisted in the work. He then called 
on R. W. Bro. John Woodburn to introduce W. Bro. Greg Robinson. 



6 - 



INTRODUCTION OF GUEST SPEAKER 

W. Bro. Greg Robinson, P.M. of Orient Lodge, No. 339, G.R.C., 
is a Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge, No. 730, G.R.C., and a 
member of the Correspondence Circle of Quatuor Coronati Lodge, No. 
2076, E.C., as well as a number of allied Masonic bodies. 

Together with R. IV. Bro. J. Lawrence Runnals, W. Bro. Robin- 
son co-authored in 1976 the final paper of the Canadian Masonic 
Research Association, "Masonic Journalism in Canada". His article, 
"The Rise and Fall of the Anti-Masonic Party", was published by the 
Masonic Service Association of the United States as its July, 1977 
Short Talk Bulletin . A contributor to the new Grand Lodge history, 
his articles have been featured in both The Freemason , Canada's 
national Masonic magazine, and the Masonic Bulletin published by 
the Grand Lodge of British Columbia. 

MORGAN: THE CANADIAN CONNECTION 

William Morgan was supposedly born in Culpeper County, Virginia 
on August 7th, 1774. He turned up in York (now Toronto) about 1820- 
1 and secured employment on a Yonge Street farm. It is said he 
rented a house in the area now known as Richmond Hill and later worked 
in a York brewery. 

John Ross Robertson informs us that Morgan's name cannot be found 
in the records of any lodge in York, either as a member or a visitor, 
between 1817 and 1822. He was not known as a Mason when he lived on 
Yonge Street, where in those days the farmers were nearly all Masons. 

By 1826, Morgan had established residence in Batavia, New York. 
Although it is not known where he was made a Mason, Morgan received 
the Royal Arch degree on May 31st, 1825 in Western Star Chapter, No. 
33 of LeRcy, New York. When a charter for a new Royal Arch Chapter 
in Batavia was sought in 1825, Morgan's name on the list of peti- 
tioners was objected to and dropped. 

Angered, Morgan decided to write a book exposing the secrets of 
Freemasonry and entered into a contract on March 13th, 1826 with 
Colonel David C. Miller, a member of a lodge in Albany, New York 
and the publisher of a weekly newspaper, the Republican Advocate . 
Colonel Miller provided the editing, publishing and printing of 
Morgan's book. Morgan applied for a copyright on his book on 
August 14th, 1826. 

On September 10th, 1826, Miller's printshop was broken into, 
some manuscript was stolen, -and fire was set to the building. The 
following morning, Morgan was arrested on a charge of petty larceny 
and taken to the county seat located at Canandaigua, New York. 

The following day, Morgan was released. It is said that he was 
then seized and forced to enter a coach, which was then driven to 
Fort Niagara, New York, where he was confined in an unused powder 

magazine. 

On September 19th, 1826, it is said that Morgan boarded a boat 
with five r.en. After the boat had been rowed to the mouth of the 
Miagara River and a rope weighted down with sinkers had been bound 
around hir. , Morgan is said to have been thrown overboard. Morgan's 
.vife biar.ed the Craft, supposedly fearful of the threatened expo- 
sure, for her husband's disappearance. 



- 7 - 

On February 3rd, 1827, the following official proclamation 
appeared in the Upper Canada Gazette under the title of "50 Pound 
Reward": 

His Excellency the Lieut. Governor having received a communication 
from His Excellency the Governor of the State of New York, by which 
it appears that William Morgan, who some years ago exercised the call- 
ing of a Brewer in this place, and who has subsequently resided at 
Canandaigua in the State of New York, was some time in the last year 
conveyed by force from that place and is supposed to be forcibly de- 
tained under false pretences in some part of this province, any per- 
son who may be able to afford information respecting the said William 
Morgan shall, upon communicating the same to the Private Secretary of 
His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor, receive the reward above off- 
ered. 

That year, four American Masons were found guilty of conspiracy 
and sentenced to prison terms ranging from one month to two years. 
The accusation that Morgan had been murdered was never proved. 

Before reviewing the effects of the case on Freemasonry in Canada, 
it is perhaps prudent to review, for comparison purposes, the fallout 
in the United States. Once made public, the case led to riots in many 
areas. Scores of lodges were forced to close down, many after their 
lodge buildings had been stormed and the lodge furniture destroyed. 
Meetings were held for the purpose of renouncing lodge membership. 
Several college fraternities were forcibly disbanded for their alleged 
subversive activities. 

By 1832, 141 anti-Masonic newspapers had been established in Ala- 
bama, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, 
Vermont and Virginia. 

The Baptist Church, meeting in convention, passed a resolution 
condemning Freemasonry and urging members to renounce lodge membership. 
The Lutheran Church Synod excommunicated all members who refused to 
resign from the Craft. This sentiment was shared by such other denom- 
inations as the Mennonites and the Quakers. 

Caught up in the turmoil in western New York at the time was 
Joseph Smith, who published the Book of Mormon in 1830 in Palmyra, New 
York. The ceremonies of the Mormon Church have a distinct Masonic 
flavour in respect to symbols, grips and passwords. Some contend that 
Smith learned these not from divine revelation, but from exposures of 
ritual printed in these anti-Masonic press. 

Hostility against the Craft soon escalated to the point where a 
political party was founded to give expression to anti-Masonic senti- 
ment. There existed a general opinion that secret orders, not only 
having something to hide, asserted illegitimate privileges and elitist 
pretensions. 

At the Party's zenith, it numbered nearly 100,000 members in New 
York State, divided the Pennsylvania vote, and established firm roots 
in Ohio and in the New England States, particularly Massachusetts. 
The Legislature of that state passed a law, later repealed, making it 
a criminal offence to administer or take an "extra-judicial" oath. 
Vermont and Rhode Island both passed similar regulations. The Party 
absorbed sufficient strength from both of the established parties in 
Vermont to gain control of the state government. For a few years, 
the party was almost the only opposition to the Democratic Party. 



8 - 



After its decline, the Anti-Masonic Party was merged into the Whig 
Party. 

Anti-Masonry's last major effort in the United States occurred 
in 1882, when a 38 -foot monument dedicated to the memory of Morgan 
was erected in Batavia by the National Christian Association. The 
inscription reads: "Sacred to the memory of William Morgan, a native 
of Virginia, a Captain in the War of 1812, a respectable citizen of 
Batavia, and a martyr to the freedom of writing, printing, and speak- 
ing the truth. He was abducted from near this spot in the year 1826 
by Freemasons and murdered for revealing the secrets of the Order". 

Meanwhile, back in British North America, the anti-Masonic reac- 
tion was not without significance. In a letter dated December 20th, 
1837 to the Grand Secretary of the United Grand Lodge of England, the 
Master of St. Andrew's Lodge of Halifax, Nova Scotia wrote that "the 
prosperity of the Craft in this country during the past ten years has 
very much declined. There are but three lodges in Halifax, and 
eleven members comprise the present strength of St. Andrew's. The 
other two lodges do not exceed that number". 

Golden Rule Lodge of Standstead, Lower Canada (now Quebec) met 
on March 3rd, 1829. W. Bro. Peasley, a Past Master, addressed the 
Lodge on the expediency of returning the Charter. Others followed, 
and at the conclusion of a lengthy and sorrowful debate, it was de- 
cided to return the Charter pending the return of more congenial and 
tranquil times. 

A committee of one was appointed to attend Grand Lodge, return 
the Charter, pay up the dues, and outline the situation leading up to 
this decision. The remaining funds, following the payment of all out- 
standing accounts, were to be divided between the public libraries 
in Georgeville and Marlow. Three brethren were delegated to take 
charge of the jewels and furniture of the Lodge. After these arrange- 
ments had been made, the valedictory was pronounced, the Lodge was 
closed, and the Brethren dispersed for a period of eighteen years. 

The furor likewise spread throughout Upper Canada (now Ontario). 
From December 9th, 1826 (less than three months after the alleged 
murder) to December 28th, 1829, there is no record of any minutes of 
St. Andrew's Lodge of Toronto. Lodge meetings were held irregularly 
at best, great secrecy was by necessity observed, and few, if any, 
records were kept. The Lodge history, however, offers the opinion 
that it is likely the Lodge did continue to meet during these troubled 
three years in the house of Bro. George Ridout "as he was an enthusias- 
tic Mason, and would no doubt see that the interest of the Lodge was 
well looked after". 

The Barton Lodge of Hamilton had no candidate initiated through- 
out this period until 1841. Relations were not maintained with any 
Grand Lodge during this time. The jewels of the Lodge remained in 
the custody of Bro. L. Land until 1836 and were not used at all until 
then. 

The meetings of Union Lodge in Grimsby were irregular and poorly 
attended during the spring of 1827. The last regular meeting prior 
to the long lapse in Masonic activities in the region was held on July 
5th, 1827. No records of any meetings appear to exist for the years 
from 1827 to 1854. During part of this time at least, the records 
and jewels of the Lodge were locked in a chest and concealed in a cave, 
carefully guarded by Bro. Samuel Kitchen and other brethren. 



- 9 - 

In the Niagara area, lukewarm brethren lost interest in the 
Craft. Niagara Lodge suffered greatly as a result of the Morgan 
incident, and a Bro. Aikman is reported to have used his lodge apron 
as a convenient receptacle for shingle nails. 

St. George's Lodge of St. Catharines did not cease operations en- 
tirely until about 1836 to 1837. It was not until 1846, when the 
third Provincial Grand Lodge had been formed, that the Lodge was re- 
activated. No records are now available prior to 1846. There may 
have been some minimal activity, however, as a nucleus of local bre- 
thren remained to effect, in due time, the re-organization. It does 
appear the jewels and regalia of the Lodge were not retained. In 
May of 1848, it was necessary to spend five pounds and ten shillings 
for new equipment. 

In Simcoe, the meetings of Norfolk Lodge were "called off" for 
over a year, with three of the brethren taking charge of the minutes, 
the jewels, and the warrant. Early in 1829, after the furor had 
abated somewhat, the Lodge reopened at its original meeting place, 
Murphy's Tavern. 

From this sampling of Canadian lodges, a pattern emerges, indi- 
cating that great difficulties were experienced during this period. 
These were of such a magnitude that it is difficult to understand them 
in this modern day and age. However, when compared to the situation 
existing south of the border, was the tempest and the fury all that 
overwhelming? 

In Canada, there is no record of any lodge hall being destroyed 
by angry mobs of outraged citizens. A national chain of anti-Masonic 
newspapers did not spring up. An anti-Masonic political party with a 
large following was not founded. No anti-Masonic monument was erec- 
ted. 

In certain American jurisdictions, such as Vermont, even the 
Grand Lodge failed to meet for several years. Such did not occur in 
Canada. 

Some contend that anti-Masonry inspired the founding of the Mor- 
mon faith, which in turn led to the birth of the state of Utah. No 
Canadian province or religious denomination can be thus traced. 

Why the difference? Obviously, as the incident occurred within 
the borders of the United States, it is natural that American Masons 
would have to bear the brunt of the reaction. 

A Grand Lodge collapse in Canada was unlikely, as the Grand Lodge 
functioning in Canada at this time were located on the other side of 
the Atlantic and were thus insulated from the front lines. 

In America, the rise of a third party was the right idea at the 
right time. The American political scene of the day was favourable 
to the founding of the Anti-Masonic Party as the Democrats under 
Andrew Jackson, Past Grand Master of Tennessee, were starting to push 
the National Republicans out of existence. Many anti-Masons realized 
it was possible to fill the vacuum created by the dominance of the 
Jacksonian Democrats through the organization of a new third party. 

The Anti-Masonic Party was able to recruit such distinguished 
American political figures as John Quincy Adams, Millard Fillmore, 
and William H. Seward, thus adding to its prestige. Unlike their 
American counterparts, Canadian Masons could fall back on the pres- 
tige of H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, the Grand Master of the United 



- 10 - 

Grand Lodge of England at the time. Local critics were no doubt 
hard pressed to contend that he would preside over an organization 
which murdered defectors. 

The Anti-Masonic Party was able to fit in with the stresses and 
strains of contemporary America. The Party appealed primarily to 
those with a rural background who were caught up in a declining agri- 
cultural society, as it offered them a measure of relief from their 
status anxieties. There existed a strong measure of egalitarian social 
thought in American anti -Masonic writings. Many Party members were 
active in abolitionist and prohibition organizations and were parti- 
sans in the fight to abolish debtors' prisons. The "peculiar insti- 
tution" of slavery would lead in a few years to the Missouri Compro- 
mise, John Brown, and the Civil War. 

Many contended that the Craft sought to benefit the few at the 
expense of others through the creation of a privileged class in the 
midst of a community entitled to enjoy equal rights and privileges. 
Others claimed that the Craft was hostile to the impartial administra- 
tion of justice. 

With a loose attachment to places and institutions, many Ameri- 
cans, particularly new arrivals, felt a compelling need to articulate 
their loyalty and demonstrate their allegiance. The Anti-Masonic 
Party might have become a permanent fixture on the American politi- 
cal scene had there existed a system of proportional representation. 

Happily, these strains were not a part of the Canadian national 
fabric. America is a nation born in revolution. This spirit con- 
tinues to the present. Public displays of patriotism are encouraged. 
Activities deemed to be "un-American" are still frowned on. 

Although Canada was not without social and political problems 
during this period of time, they were not of such a nature to permit 
the seeds of anti-Masonry to flourish, accounting for the restrained 
and relatively mild reaction here. 

The rise of the Mormon Church in western New York state during 
the height of the anti-Masonic controversy and the subsequent found- 
ing of the state of Utah is one of the great American success stories. 
With freedom of religion specifically guaranteed by the U.S. Constitu- 
tion, the nation abounds in cults and denominations, perhaps as a 
result of the spirited independence of the American people. Mormonism 
was only one of several major denominations founded in the United 
States during the early 19th century. The not inconsiderable influ- 
ence of the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches at the time no doubt 
restricted the amount of fertile ground available for a parallel 
phenomenon in Canada. 

This paper has attempted to identify William Morgan, briefly 
outline the Morgan Incident itself, review the reaction in the United 
States, compare that reaction to the reaction in Canada, and account 
for the difference between the two. If only one reader has been 
sufficiently intrigued to dig deeper, then this paper has been success- 
ful. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Goodwin, S.H. Mormonism and Masonry 

Salt Lake City: Grand Lodge of Utah, 1938. ' 



- 11 - 



Harris, Reginald V. The Great William Morgan Mystery 

Montreal: Canadian Masonic Research Association, 1 



958. 



Harris, Reginald V. The History of St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 1, G.R.N.S. , 
1750-1950 
Kentville, NS : Kentville Publishing, 1950. 

MacDonald, Norman. The Barton Lodge, 1795-1945 . 
Toronto: The Ryerson Press, 1945. 

Marsh, E. J. History of Union Lodge, No. 7, 1799-1949 
Grimsby: The Independent Press, 1949. 

Moore, Rev. Arthur Henry. History of Golden Rule Lodge, No. 5, 

Standstead, Quebec, 1803-1903 
Toronto: William Briggs Press, 1905. 

Pearce, Bruce M. Origins of Freemasonry in Norfolk County, 1804-1954 
Simcoe: Pearce Publishing Company, 1954 . 

Robertson, John Ross. History of Freemasonry in Canada 
Toronto: George Morang § Co., 1900. 

Robinson, Greg. The Rise and Fall of the Anti-Masonic Party 

Silver Spring, MD: Masonic Service Association of the United 
States, 1977. 

Runnalls, J. Lawrence. Historical Sketch of St. George's Lodge, No. 

15, 1814-1964 
St. Catharines: The Manning Press, 1964. 

Smith, Henry T. Brief History of St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 16, 1822- 
1912 
Toronto: The Bryant Press, 1912. 

REVIEWS: 

By R. W. Bro. J. Lawrence Runnals and W. Bro. George A. Campbell 

W. Bro. Robinson is to be congratulated on his handling of the 
perplexing question of William Morgan and especially with the connec- 
tion with Canadian Masonry. Over the many years, there have been 
published many accounts of this incident but none has attempted to 
show the effect on Canadian lodges. Bro. Robinson is well qualified 
for this task as he has made a special study of the topic and has 
written widely on it. 

However, having said this, we would like to bring the attention 
of Bro. Robinson and the Lodge to several points that might have had 
further attention. 

The first has to do with the connection between the Mormon Church- 
and Freemasonry and in particular the part played by Joseph Smith, the 
founder of the Church, and his connection with a Masonic lodge. A 
fine series of articles on Mormanism and Masonry appeared in The 
Builder of 1921 and 1927 by S. H. Goodwin, P.G.M. of Utah. No doubt 
these articles have been expanded into book form in 1938 as referred 
to by Bro. Robinson. One quotation might be of interest: 



- 12 - 

"Followers of Joseph Smith believe that Temple Ceremonies were re- 
vealed to the Prophet complete more than a year before he became a 
Mason and the proof of this is to be found in the 'Doctrines and Cove- 
nants '" . 

Apparently Joseph Smith did not become a Mason until 1842 and then 
was made a Mason-at-sight . His last words when he died by an ass- 
assination's bullet on June 27, 1844, were quoting Masonic ritual. 
If Smith did not become a Mason until 1842 how could the William Mor- 
gan incident have any bearing on the Mormon Church? It would be 
interesting for Bro. Robinson to explain where he got his informa- 
tion for his claim. 

The second point has to do with the disappearance of Morgan in 
1826. The advertisement which appeared in the Upper Canada Gazette 
would indicate that the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada did not 
consider that Morgan had been murdered. Many clues were suggested 
as to what had happened to him. We would like to refer to one of 
them. In the September issue 1954 of the Royal Arch Mason, Harold V. 
B. Voorhis of New Jersey has an article entitled "What? William 
Morgan Again!", in which it is suggested that Morgan got as far as 
the Little Cayman Island in the Carribean and there spent the final 
days of his life. Many points are given to connect the William Mor- 
gan of his story with the William Morgan of Batavia. This makes 
interesting reading and might be pursued further. 

Thirdly, it would seem that the Morgan Incident was "the last 
straw that broke the camel's back". It would be interesting to con- 
sider what might have happened without the 'incident'. The Anti- 
Masonic movement had been steadily building up for some time and 
this incident seems to have brought it to a head. The abduction of 
Morgan in itself would not have triggered such a violent action. 
The underlying causes might form the basis of a further paper. 



son. 



We have nothing but praise for the fine effort of W. Bro. Robin 
By Bro. Glenson T. Jones: 



I am happy to have been given the opportunity to review this 
paper by W. Bro. Robinson. It gave me the incentive to read in some 
depth into this very interesting subject. 

I liked the paper and felt that it was well balanced and flowed 
well. I was, however, vaguely disappointed at the end. On re- 
reading, I discovered that the reason lay in the expectations 
which the title stimulated. 

From "The Canadian Connection", I assumed that the subject of 
the paper would hinge around the known and rumored involvement of 
Canadian Masons in the Morgan Incident itself. J. Ross Robertson 
stated that Morgan's abductors had negotiated with Canadian Masons 
to arrange for settling him in Upper Canada. These plans apparently 
came to naught. J. R. R. further quoted a statement by Thurlow 
Weed that one of the five men who allegedly rowed Morgan to the mouth 
of the river and threw him overboard was a Canadian Mason from York 
(now Toronto) by the name of George Garside. A more descriptive 
title might have been "Morgan: The Canadian Connection", but enough 
about the title. 



- 13 - 

I noticed a few places in the introductory summary of the 
Morgan Incident where I would have added a few additional words of 
explanation; nothing, however, that detracted from the focus of the 
paper. 

In relation to the reaction to the Morgan Incident in the U.S.A., 
one item intrigued me a lot. That was the reference to the Masonic 
flavour of the ceremonies of the Mormon Church. While this could 
probably be developed into an interesting paper in itself, the re- 
ference was so brief that I felt it diverted attention from the main 
subject. 

The last half of the paper dealt with the reaction to the Morgan 
incident in Canada and a contrast of that reaction with that in the 
United States. This is where most of the creative effort in this 
paper was put and to good effect. I would certainly like to see 
further research done in this area. 

I hope that one of the other reviewers has an American back- 
ground and has critiqued the paper, particularly* the concluding sec- 
tion, from an American point of view. It is from such contrasts of 
viewpoint that we learn to see past ourselves and become bigger 
people. 

The author has certainly succeeded in his wish to stimulate 
interest in this incident and its impact on both the U.S.A. and, 
more particularly, Canada. 

By W. Bro. Donald Gorman: 

Let me commence by saying that I feel a sense of pride in being 
considered a worthy reviewer for a scholarly Masonic paper that has 
been accepted for delivery to, and publication by, The Heritage Lodge. 

It was a pleasure for me to read W. Bro. Robinson's refreshing 
treatment of the Morgan affair, an approach that brings to us the 
little known "Canadian Connection". After a brief description of 
the affair itself, so well known to so many Masons, Robinson pursues 
his principal aims as outlined in his last paragraph, namely, the 
effects of the affair on "Canadian" Masonry; and a comparison of the 
effects in the United States and British North America. 

The brief but adequate treatment of the effects on "our" Lodges, 
is selective and informative. However, the analysis of the compari- 
son of the effects in the United States and Canada could do with some 
bolstering. I feel the author might have pointed out more strongly 
the difference in age, population and cohesiveness of the two 
"countries", the one, at the time of the affair, already 50 years old, 
and the other not to be born until some 50 years hence. He also fails 
to discuss, or indeed indicate, the most important reason for the 
intense effect in the United States and mild in Canada, that of the 
relative influence of Masonry in each country - in Canada feeble, 
and in the United States, powerful . As an example of this powerful 
U.S. force, let me quote the following, taken from the Report of The 
Committee on the Abduction of William Morgan, made to the New York 
State Senate at Albany, on February M, 1829. 

"These men (Masons) can effect (.-very thing within the compass of 
human effort. If the order were to exert itself in aid of charitable 
objects, not an individual in the State could be either hungry or 
naked; want would be a stranger in our borders, and vast funds would 



- 14 - 

remain unexpended. If their zeal and industry were turned to the 
occult sciences, to which they have preferred a devotion, the driest 
and most abstruce problems of geometricians, the algebraists and the 
astronomers, would long before this, have been. as familiar to us all 
as the road to market. But if unmindful of charitable objects, and 
neglecting the pursuit of the arts and sciences, which they have pre- 
ferred as their leading measures, they should, like the rest of man- 
kind, be tempted by the allurements of power to make an effort to 
acquire it; all will conferr, they must be irrutible, so long as the 
people remain ignorant of their secret design. Nothing but a belief 
or knowledge of their design, and public opinion brought to bear 
upon them at the ballot boxes, in countervailing measures, would at 
all check this otherwise resistlen power.'" 

This is the kind of action that gave rise to what the physicist 
would call "an equal and opposite reaction", and explain the degree 
to which anti-Masonry was generated in the United States. 

Finally, it was mildly disconcerting, to find in the biblio- 
graphy, the absence of - 

"Anti-Masonry - The Crusade and the Party" 
American Historical Source Series 
Research and Interpretation by Norman 
Ratner, Prentice-Hall, 1069. 

This scholarly work on the influence of the Morgan Affair on the poli- 
tical life in the United States, should have been referred to in the 
preparation of this significant paper. 

I congratulate W. Bro. Robinson on his presentation, and recommend 
it to all Masons on both sides of the border. 

SUMMARY by W. Bro. Greg Robinson 

I am indebted to these competent and thoughtful reviews, and 
would like to restrict my "rebuttal" mainly to the Mormon question. 

I considered this angle too important to ignore entirely, but did 
not think it apropos to explore it in great depth at this time. 

It was not necessary for Joseph Smith, the Mormon "prophet", to 
be made a Mason in order for him to learn- everything there was to know 
about the Craft. Smith, in the centre of the anti-Masonic fury then 
sweeping western New York state at that time, would have had ready 
access to the many exposes of the ritual published in the press. Four 
years of controversy elapsed between the Morgan Incident of 1826 in 
Batavia, New York and the publication of the first edition of the Book 
of Mormon in 1830 in Palmyra, New York. 

Finally, it was noted that anti-Masonry existed prior to Morgan. 
Indeed, it dates back to the late 18th century. Those Americans who 
had no sympathy for the Jacobin phase=~of the French Revolution of 1789 
turned to the theory that a Masonic conspiracy was responsible, a con- 
cept not without some foundation in view of the founding of the sub- 
versive illuminati Order in 1776, its infiltration of continental 
Freemasonry, and its subsequent role in the French Revolution. As 
with the Mormon angle, a story in itself. 



- 15 - 



APPRECIATION 

At this time R. W. Bro. Grinton called on W. Bro. Allen Cohoe, 
who extended the sincere thanks of the Brethren for a most inter- 
esting and informative paper which was heartily supported by the 
applause of those present. 

V. W. Bro. .Pos added his appreciation and also thanked W. Bro. 
Robinson for the special gift of Lodge Tools in a specially de- 
signed wood chest. The tools and chest were made by "Kenning Manu- 
facturer", London England for Lombardian Lodge No. 2348. 

The Worshipful Master then called on W. Bro. George Campbell who, 
on behalf of R. W. Bro. Lawrence Runnalls, the former editor of the 
Grand Lodge Bulletin: presented the Lodge with two bound copies of the 
Lodge Summonses for the year 1978-79, which was graciously received 
and acknowledged by R. W. Bro. Keity Flynn, I. P.M. 

Following a status report of the Lodge Collar and Jewels by R. W. 
Bro. Ed Wilson and several announcements, the Lodge was closed in 
harmony at 11:22 PM and the Brethren adjourned to the Banquet Hall for 
a brief social period and light refreshments. 

COMING EVENTS 

FEBRUARY 21, 1980 (Thursday) - The Heritage Lodge will make a Frater- 
nal Visit at the Regular Meeting of Preston Lodge No. 297, in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, as part of the Water- 
loo District Inter-Lodge Visitation Program. V. W. Bro. Jacob 
(Jack) Pos will present an Illustrated Lecture Titled "Preserving 
our Masonic Heritage", featuring the Masonic Temples in Los 
Angeles and Philadelphia. The Worshipful Master, R. W. Bro. 
Donald Grinton has requested a good representation from the Heri- 
tage Lodge. There will be no degrees conferred at this meeting, 
with ample opportunity for fraternization. 

MARCH 19, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of the Heritage Lodge, 

and the Official visit of R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn, District Deputy 
Grand Master of Waterloo District. We will be privileged on this 
occasion to have R. W. Bro. Charles A. Sankey, a Charter Member 
of our Lodge, present a paper titled "An Overview of Old Scottish 
Rite Degrees Not Including the Craft Degrees" (These have never 
been conferred by an English Speaking Supreme Council) . 

MAY 21, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of the Heritage Lodge. Bro. 
John E. Taylor will present a paper titled "The Lodge Room, Lodge 
Furniture, Regalia and other Masonic Matters". Bro. Taylor is a 
recipient of the coveted William Mercer Wilson Medal and the first 
person to receive it for academic contribution to Masonic Research 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of the Heritage Lodge, 
and the Annual Election of Officers. A masonic paper will be pre- 
sented. The title to be announced in the next summons. 

NOVEMBER 19, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge, 
and the Annual Installation of the Worshipful Master and the In- 
vestiture of the Officers. 

Other Masonic Papers to be presented at future meetings include: 



- 16 - 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for example: 
Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, Rosicrucians , 
Prince Hall Masons, etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodge formerly 
on the Register and now struck off, by Bro . John E. Taylor. 

3. A Review of Important Similarities of Our Grand Masters, by R. W. 
Bro. Lawrence Runnalls and W. Bro. George Campbell. 

4. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 

5. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up to Date Review 

6. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian Chief 
by V. W. Bro. J. Pos. 

NOTE: Suggestions for titles for masonic papers and recommendations 

for research scholars should be directed to the Chairman of the 
Committee on Masonic Information or to the Lodge Secretary. 

IN MEMORIAM 
R. W. Bro. William Simon McVittie 

Initiated into New Hope Lodge No. 279, July 4, 1929 

Passed New Hope Lodge No. 279, November 12, 1929 

Raised New Hope Lodge No. 279, January 15, 1930 
Installated as Worshipful Master, December 11, 1949 
D.D.G.M., Wellington District July, 1957 

Charter Member of: 

Concord Lodge No. 722, G.R.C. 

Cambridge Lodge No. 728, G.R.C. 

The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C. 

The Otto Klotz Lodge No. 731, G.R.C. 

Also a Member of: 
Preston Lodge No. 297, G.R.C. 

On September 17, 1979 , Brother McVittie received from the Grand 
Master, M. W. Bro. N. R. Richards, a Masonic Jewel marking 50 years of 
faithful service to Freemasonry. Also, that same evening, The William 
S. McVittie Bursary Fund was established as a token of Brotherly Love. 

Passed to the Grand Lodge Above 
January 17, 1980 

We cherish his memory in our heart 



17 



WHO REALLY STARTED THE MOVEMENT FOR AN INDEPENDENT 
GRAND LODGE IN CANADA 

V. W. Bro. J. Pos 

Several Historians have concluded that "the honor of taking the 
first step toward the formation of an independent Grand Lodge be- 
longs to King Solomon's Lodge" (The History of Freemasonry in Canada, 
by M. W. Bro. John Ross Robertson, page 629, Vol. II). M. W. Bro. 
Daniel Spry makes a similar statement in his written historical 
sketch of King Solomon's Lodge, No. 222. 

While it may be true that the first Masonic Convention to dis- 
cuss self government was proposed by V. W. Bro. Kivas Tully, P.M. 
of King Solomon's Lodge on November 10, 1853, it must be remembered 
that a large number of Lodges in Canada West, who received their 
warrants from the Grand Lodge of England, were under the authority 
of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Canada West. On the other hand, the 
eleven Lodges warranted by the Grand Lodge of Ireland, had no pro- 
vincial organization, but reported separately to their mother Grand 
Lodge. 

It should also be remembered that many masons including V. W. 
Bro. Kivas Tully and Bro. Thomas B. Harris, held dual membership in 
Lodges on the Grand Register of England. Both Tully and Harris 
appear as members in the Register of Strict Observance Lodge, and 
were also appointed as Officers of the Provincial Grand Lodge of 
Canada West. 

Therefore, it would be logical that the Irish Brethren might 
desire a similar self ruling body, and much of their efforts were 
devoted to their own specific cause. However, as a result of their 
exposure to the problems encountered by their English Brethren, their 
plans also included the freedom to select their own ruling head and 
the retention of all fees for Warrants, Certificates and Benevolence. 
This was unacceptable to the Grand Lodge of Ireland, according to 
their reply which was laid before King Solomon's Lodge on 10th of 
May, 1855 (The History of Freemasonry ' in Canada, J. Ross Robertson, 
page 631, Vol. II) . 

At a subsequent convention in Hamilton on the 14th of May, 1855, 
a delegation consisting of Bros. Harris, Daniel, Allen and McMullen 
was instructed to attend a meeting of the Provincial Grand Lodge at 
Niagara Falls on July 19, 1855, to advocate united action with the 
English Lodges of Canada West in the erection of an independent 
Grand Lodge. 

However, prior to this development, and commencing with the Four 
teenth Communication of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Canada West, 
held at Toronto in June, 1852, (The History of Freemasonry in Canada, 
J. Ross Robertson, page 539, Vol. II), the provincial Grand Lodge 
was already discussing a similar alternative. Therefore, it is con- 
ceivable that it was also being discussed in the individual Lodges; 
and our Irish Brethren would have had ample opportunity to observe 
the feelings of the brethren and also to participate in the discus- 
sions . 

These discussions no doubt gained many advocates, and a proposal 
to form ah independent Grand Lodge in Canada was introduced as early 
as 1851, by the Barton Lodge No. 10 P.G.R., E.R., when a resolution 
was adopted on December 10, 1851, 



- 18 - 

"That a committee be appointed to confer with Strict 
Observance Lodge concerning the propriety of addressing 
the various sister lodges in Canada on the subject of 
withdrawing from the Grand Lodge of England and estab- 
lishing an independent Grant Lodge of Canada." (The 
Grand Lodge of Canada, by R. W. Bro . A. T. Freed, Paper 
presented before The Barton Lodge No. 6, A.F. and A.M., 
September 4th, 1905) . This was at least two years before 
Tully's proposal in King Solomon's Lodge, No. 222, G.R.I. 

The committee completed its assignment, and the subsequent corre- 
spondence was laid before the members of Strict Observance Lodge just 
6 days later on December 16, 1851. As a member of this lodge, it is 
probable that Bro. T. B. Harris was in attendance, and that the pro- 
found discussions would have had a significant influence which is 
evidence from his activities in subsequent events which brought 
about the formation of an independent Grand Lodge. 

From the foregoing and until other records prove otherwise, it 
would appear that the efforts of The Barton Lodge predate those of 
King Solomon's Lodge by at least 2 years, and that to The Barton Lodge 
should be extended the honor of initiating the first discussions to- 
ward the formation of an independent Grand Lodge in Canada, and that 
a good deal of the work was carried out by Lodges holding warrants 
from the Grand Lodge of England. 

However, you may arrive at a different conclusion after seeing an 
authentic re-enactment, in full costume of the period, of the historic 
events leading up to the formation of The Most Worshipful the Grand 
Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Canada. The dramatization 
will take place in the Concert Hall of the Royal York Hotel on Tuesday 
afternoon, July 15th, 1980, at the time of the 125th Annual Communica- 
tion of Grand Lodge. 



A SPECIAL APPZA: 



Whereas a number of our Members have become the W.M. of their 
respective Lodges, and Others have received a masonic promotion, and 
whereas we would like to keep our records complete and up to date, we 
therefore ask that you keep us informed of any changes. The following 
is a typical listing which we prepare for our Lodge Representatives 
in their respective Districts. 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT 

DE ZEEUW, Leonard James , P.M. 
P.O. Box 6b, Elora St., 
Teeswater, Ont., NOG 2S0 
M.L., Donard Lodge No. 677, G.R.I. 
C.L., Teeswater Lodge No. 276, G.R.C. 
'Res., (519) 392-6879 
Bus . , 

Give name in full underlining preferred given name, followed by 
Masonic Rank, address, Mother Lodge (M.L.), and the current Lodge 
(C.L.), prior to affiliation with The Heritage Lodge. Send the 
information to the Lodge Secretary, or bring it with you to the next 
Regular Meeting, March 19th. 



- 19 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 
M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn 

75 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 

LODGE OFFICERS 
1978-79 



W.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


.P.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


J.W. 


W.Bro. 


S.D. 


W.Bro. 


J.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


1.6. 


R.W.Bro. 


S.S. 


R.W.Bro. 


J.S. 


W.Bro. 



Donald S. Grinton 
Keith R. A. Flynn 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
George E. Zwicker 
Balfour LeGresley 
David C. Bradley 
C. E. Drew 
Robert Throop 
Albert A. Barker 



Tyler R.W.Bro. 

Sec'y V. W.Bro. 

A/Sec'y W.Bro. 

Treas. R.W.Bro. 

D.C. R.W.Bro. 

Chap. W.Bro. 
Organist R.W.Bro. 
Historian W.Bro. 



C. F. Grimwood 
Jacob Pos 
Joseph J. Vliehs 
W. E. Wilson 
Roy S. Sparrow 
Rev. W.G. Rivers 
L.R. Hertel 
Henry G. Edgar 



LODGE COMMITTEES FOR 1979-80 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, (S.W.); 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION $ TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, 

(J.W.): W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); and R.W.Bro. David C. 
Bradley. 

MEMBERSHIP $ UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W.Bro. 

Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. Bert 
Mennie; and R.W.Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT § ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Robert Throop, (S.S.); 
W.Bro. Albert A. Barker, (J.S.); Local Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, . R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. C. E. 
Grimwood, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. Gary 
Powell; and V.W. Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V.W. Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; and R.W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. James 
Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw; W.Bro. 
Paul Engel; and Bro. Kenneth Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 
Steen; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's 
name, this is an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge 
By-Laws. The duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in 
Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for an 
annual budget. 



- 20 -• 
FOR THE FUTURE OF FREEMASONRY IN ONTARIO 

Our Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother N.R. Richards, has 
appointed a Long Range Planning Committee to make an in-depth study 
into our present system of operation. This Committee is very anxious 
to have help from the Brethren, Lodges and other interested groups. 
For the present, the Committee is directing it's approach to three 
important items: 

1 . Structure 

2. Finance 

3. Commitment and Awareness 

STRUCTURE 

The Committee wants to study closely the present structure of 
Grand Lodge and the areas in -which it can be improved. At present there 
are 4 3 Districts representing a total of 645 Lodges. For the past 
several years, it has been convenient to have regionalized meetings. 

FINANCE 

Financing is a large problem. Should Grand Lodge be giving 
more direction to the constituent Lodges in this regard? Are there 
other sources of income, besides dues, which would be within the 
framework of our Constitution? Can measures be taken to reduce our 
expenses at the Lodge level? 

COMMITMENT AND AWARENESS 

The Committee wants to explore and see if there are other ways 
in which to improve the commitment and awareness of the Masons, not 
only to their local Lodge but to Masonry in general, it's principles 
and ideals. 

. HOW TO RESPOND 

The Long Range Planning Committee solicits comments and ideas 
in the form of written submissions to help in the study. These 
comments and ideas may be sent or given to the Lodge Secretary, who 
will forward them to the District Deputy Grand Master. Brethren do 
not forget, this is YOUR Grand Lodge. Help the Committee to make 
sound recommendations so that in the future, YOUR Grand Lodge can 
function to it's highest potential for the good of Masons and 
Masonry in Ontario. 



^Proceedings; 

tEJje Rentage Xobge J?o.730 



ajf.&a.jfl., &&.€. 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Donald G.S. Grinton 
28 Cambridge Dr. , 
Brantford, Ontario 
N3R 5S2 
(519) 759-3182 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23. 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. » 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-4995 



Vol. 03, No. 03 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



March, 1980 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting 
and General Purpose Committee Meeting; Proceedings of the Twelfth 
Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, March 19th, 1980; and notice 
of coming events. 

PLEASE NOTE: The opinions expressed by the authors and reviewers, 
in these Proceedings, are not necessarily those of 
the Lodge or its members. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By direction from the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Donald G.S. 
Grinton, you are hereby requested to attend the Thirteenth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple located at the North-East corner of the intersection of 
Highways No. 401 and 24 on; 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 21ST, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such business 
as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. This is also the 
occasion when one or more Sister Lodges from Waterloo District will 
be present in accordance with the Waterloo District Inter-Lodge 
Visitation Program. We shall be expecting visits from both Wilmont 
Lodge No. 318 and New Dominion Lodge No. 205 who both share the 
same Lodge Room Facilities in Baden, Ontario. 

Brother John Edward Taylor, a member of The Heritage Lodge, 
and our Representative for the District of Algoma East will 
present a paper titled "The Lodge Room, Lodge Furniture, Regalia 
and other Masonic Matters". 

The Reports of the Committees of Enquiry for the Applications 
for Affiliation as presented in the last Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 
02, January 1980, all report favourable, and we shall therefore 
ballot on the following at the Regular Meeting, May 21st, 1980: 



- 2 - 



1. R.W.Bro. Donald James Emerick; Age 35; Salesman; 506 George 
St., Sarnia, Ontario. 

2. R.W.Bro. Burton Stanley Freer; Age 64; Layout Developer; 
R.R. #6, Cambridge, Ontario. 

3. R.W.Bro. Aksel Aggerholm; Age 53; Operation Manager; 825 
North Service Road, Mississauga, Ontario. 

4. V.W.Bro. William John Brook; Age 61; Rental Clerk; 808-176 
Vidal Street South, Sarnia, Ontario. 

5. W.Bro. F. Harland Seens; Age 65; Sales Manager; P.O. 
Bailieboro, Ontario. 

6. W.Bro. John Kenneth Marty; Age 78; Retired Druggist; 114 
Lovers Lane, Ancaster, Ontario. 

7. W.Bro. Leverne Ferguson; Age 68; Retired; 46 Stannes PI., 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 

8. W.Bro. George Robert Jackson; Age 61; Retired; 68 Balaclava 
St., St. Thomas, Ontario. 

9. W.Bro. John M. Boersma; Age 54; Money Market Trader; 301 
Dixon Road, Weston, Ontario. 

10. Bro. Eugene Charlton Gerhart; Age 60; Barrister; Box 482, 11 
Brenda Ave., Parry Sound, Ontario. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

The General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 9TH, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and Appointed 
Committees are urgently requested to attend. All members are 
particularly welcome. See under Coming Events page 28 for 
details of important issues to be discussed. General Committees 
will be meeting to finalize their reports before the meeting begin: 
Chairmen are advised to remind their members. 



Sincerely and fraternally, 



V.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos, 
Secretary. 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Twelfth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 
G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, 
Wednesday, March 19th, 1980, with 13 Officers, 41 Members and 18 
Visitors for a total of 72 Masons as per Lodge Register. 



- 3 - 



OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:30 p.m., with 
the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton in the East. 
R.W.Bro. Ed Wilson acted as I. P.M., and W.Bro. Albert A. Barker 
acted as J.W. The Worshipful Master welcomed the Brethren and 
announced that he would proceed immediately into the Business 
Agenda and call the Lodge from labour to refreshment promptly 
at 7:55 p.m. to formally receive the visitors. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. David Bradley, that the minutes of the Eleventh Regular 
Meeting, held on November 21st, 1979, be adopted as circulated 
in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 02. Carried. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The reports of Committees on Applications for Affiliation, 
as listed on page 4 in the Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 02, dated 
January, 1980, reported favourable. 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Pos, seconded by W.Bro. 
LeGresley, that the reports be received, the committees discharged 
and proper notice of ballot, stating particular of the name, age, 
occupation and residence of the application given in the summons 
for the next regular meeting of the Lodge. Carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, dated January 4, 1980, 
granting approval for the amendments to our By-Laws, as 
proposed on page 5, Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 01, dated 
October, 1979. 

2. From Bro. Thomas Schmidt, of Brotherhood Lodge No. 723, G.R.C., 
Announcing the second Charles Fotheringham Memorial Lecture 

to be held May 2, 1980, at 8:00 p.m., in the K-W Masonic 
Temple. The Guest Speaker will be R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod. 

3. From W.Bro. John Neu, Chairman of the Budget Committee of 
the Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corporation, dated 
March 6, 1980, requesting a representative from The Heritage 
Lodge to attend a meeting of the Corporation to be held in 

the Temple on Saturday, March 29, 2:00 p.m., with such informa- 
tion as - number of meetings each year, number of members and 
any other data relevent to the meeting. 

4. From W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs, dated March 13, 1980, announcing 
his resignation as Assistant Secretary of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, and requesting a Demit. 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, seconded 
by R. W.Bro. C.E. Drew, that the correspondence be received and 
the necessary action taken. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNT/S 

The following accounts amounting to $490.06 were presented, 
and on a motion by V. W.Bro. Pos, seconded by W.Bro. Wm. Boston, 
were passed and ordered paid: 

Secretary's Account: 

- Postage up to March 15, 1980 $ 13.92 

- Post Office Deposit Account, Inv. #391905 42.00 
334 Office Services, Inv. #9866 20.00 

Inv. #9869 3.00 
Guelph Printing Services Ltd. : 

- 1500 Kraft Envelopes, preprinted, #18157 92.70 

- 500 #10 Envelopes, #18158 35.28 
Kopy Print, Guelph, Ont. : 

- 400 copies of Proceedings, Inv. #126 161.50 

- 1000 copies, Information Leaflet, 99.50 
W.Bro. Donald Kaufman: 

- March meeting refreshments 22 . 16 

TOTAL $490.06 



RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications were received from the following: 

1. CARSONS, Edward Sidney Patrick, D.D.G.M.; 87 Thornton Ave., 
London; Age 51; Real Estate Broker; member of Union Lodge 
No. 380, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. Jack Pos and R.W. 
Bro. Charles Grimwood. 

2. DICKINSON, Wilbur J.; P.D.D.G.M.; 18 Freeman Dr., Port Hope; 
Age 65; Retired; member of Ontario Lodge No. 26, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. W.H. Perryman and W.Bro. P. McNeil. 

3. HARRIS, Charles Russell, D.D.G.M.; 31 Johnstone Blvd., 
Walkerton; Age 63; Car Dealer; member of Saugeen Lodge No. 
197, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. A.N. Newell and R.W. Bro. 
E.J. Scarborough. 

4. ANDERSON, Harold S. , P. A. CO.; 1915 Fairport Rd. , Pickering; 
Age 71; Retired Past Master; member of Doric Lodge No. 424, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. C.E. Drew and R.W. Bro. Frank 
Bruce. 

5. CHISHOLM, Frank William, P.G.S.; Hornby, Ontario; Age 68; 
Sheriffs Officer; member of St. Clair Lodge No. 135, G.R.C.; 
recommended by V. W.Bro. Robt. S. McMaster and R.W. Bro. W. 

Ed Wilson. 

6. BUTTLER, Lancelot Francis, P.M.; 44 Langside Ave., Weston; 
Age 61; Carpenter; member of Memorial Lodge No. 652, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. H.J. Armstrong and R.W. Bro. James W. 
Gerrard. 



5 - 



7. DOUGLAS, Barry Allan, P.M.; 102 Pinehurst Dr., Welland; 

36; member of Cope-Stone Lodge No. 373 G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. J M. Plyley and W.Bro. R.E. Gardiner. 

8. GRIFFITHS, Charles Raymond, P.M.; 13 William St., Parry Sound; 
Age 40; Plant Engineer; member of Granite Lodge No. 352, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. Eugene Gerhart and R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph. 

9. HENDERSON, Thomas, P.M.; R.R. #2, Orono; Age 35; Vice Principal; 
member of Orono Lodge No. 325, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley and R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod. 

10. HOWARTH, Jerry Michael, P.M.; P.O. Box 400, Bancroft; Age 42; 
Merchant; member of Bancroft Lodge No. 482, G.R.C.; recommended 
by W.Bro. George Zwicker and R.W. Bro. Frank Bruce. 

11. ION, Donald, P.M.; 9 Barnes Ave., Brantford; Age 53; Design 
Engineer; member of Reba Lodge No. 515, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. D.L. Sandison and R.W.Bro. Thomas E. Greenaway. 

12. MOORE, Donald Ross, P.M.; R.R. #3, Heather's Point, Brockville; 
Age 43; Pharmacist; member of Sussex Lodge No. 5, G.R.C.; 
recommended by V. W.Bro. Donald Woodside and V. W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

13. O'NEILL, Maurice William George, P.M.; R.R. #1, Newtonville; 
Age 51; Farmer; member of Durham Lodge No. 66, G.R.C.; recom- 
mended by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph. 

14. TONKIN, Stanley Lloyd, P.M.; 44 Bay Street, Parry Sound; 
Age 59; Manager; member of Granite Lodge No. 3 52, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. Eugene Gerhart and R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph. 

15. FOREST-JONES, Reginald, M.M. ; 464 Manchester Rd . , Kitchener; 
Age 62; School Teacher; member of Brotherhood Lodge No. 723, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Gray Rivers and W.Bro. Henry 
C. Wolfe. 

16. GILDER, Roy Dawson, M.M. ; 172 Church St., Brockville; Age 71; 
Retired; member of Salem Lodge No. 368, G.R.C.; recommended 
by V. W.Bro. Donald Woodside and V. W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

17. GORDON, Robert FitzGerald, M.M. ; 2021 Stonehenge Cresc, Ottawa; 
Age 40; Economist; member of Chaudiere Lodge No. 264, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. G.T. Jones and V. W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

18. HARRISON, Percy Rupert, M.M. ; 192 - 6th Street, Toronto; 

Age 55; Firefighter; member of Lakeshore Lodge No. 645, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. Frank L. Dunn and R.W.Bro. James W. 
Gerrard. 

19. HERRON, John Leonard, M.M. ; 44 Hickory Place, Brantford; Age 42; 
Adult Educator; member of Brant Lodge No. 45, G.R.C.; recommended 
by W.Bro. Harry Chivers and R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton. 

20. HUNTER, James R. , M.M. ; 255 Ridge Drive, Milton; Age 51; 
Maintenance Superintendent; member of St. Clair Lodge No. 
135, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. Robert McMaster and 
R.W.Bro. W. Ed Wilson. 

21. LISCUMB, Paul, M.M. ; 12 Brookbridge Dr., Scarborough; Age 57; 
Retired; member of Stanley Lodge No. 426, G.R.C.; recommended 
by W.Bro. Robert McTavish and Bro. Kenneth Clark. 



6 - 



22. MCKISSACK, Malcolm John, M.M. ; 23 Bendingroad Cresc, St. 
Catharines; Age 34; member of Seymour Lodge No. 277, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. John R. Payette and V.W.Bro. John Storrie. 

23. PLATT, Thomas Wilbert, M.M. ; 115 Amaranth Street West, Grand 
Valley; Age 76; Retired; member of Scott Lodge No. 421, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. Carmon R. Plester and R. W.Bro. Keith Flynn. 

24. SILK, Thomas Ross, M.M. ; 9336 Alten Street, Windsor; Age 47; 
Service Technician; member of Palace Lodge No. 604, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. James N. Hayes and Bro. Thomas Crowley. 

25. STANTON, David Peter, M.M. ; 73 Alexander Blvd., St. Catharines; 
Age 42; Sales Manager; member of Seymour Lodge No. 277, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. John R. Payette and V.W.Bro. John Storrie. 

26. VARLEY, Russell John, M.M. ; 1414 Amber Cresc, Oakville; 

Age 35; member of South Gate Lodge No. 674, G.R.C.; recommended 
by W.Bro. William T. Boratynec and W.Bro. Wm. J. Boston. 

In addition, applications for Affiliation were received from 
W.Bro. Donald William Bain and Bros. Arnold Russell Colbert, John 
A. Chadbourne, Kenneth Duncan Fraser, Robert J.T. Smith, Donald 
V.H. Vale and Lint Arthur Welin, all of North Bay Lodge 617, G.R.C.; 
Bro. Arthur James Mclsaac of Lacayan Lodge No. 8188, G.R.E., and 
living in North Bay; and Bro. Terrance John Thorn of Espanola 
Lodge No. 527, G.R.C., however, as we have no members of The Heritage 
Lodge from that area, the applications are being held over until 
members of the Lodge are able to visit North Bay and become acquainted 
with the Applicants. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded 
by W.Bro. Wm. Boratynec, that the applications be received, the 
usual committees appointed and the summons for the next regular 
meeting of the lodge shall indicate that the applications have 
been received, together with the names of the members recommending 
the applicants. Carried. 

FROM LABOUR TO REFRESHMENT 

At 7:57 p.m., the Lodge was called from labour to refreshment 
for the space of 10 minutes. 

FROM REFRESHMENT TO LABOUR 

The Lodge was called to resume labour at 8:08 p.m. 

At this time, R. W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow, D.C., was admitted 
into the Lodge to introduce, a number of Worshipful Masters and 
visiting Brethren who were welcomed in the traditional manner. 

R. W.Bro. Director of Ceremonies was again admitted to present 
R. W.Bro. Lewis Hahn, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District on his official 
visit accompanied by a number of Grand Lodge Officers, D.D.G.M.'s 
and members of the Board of General Purposes. 

After receiving grand honours, R. W.Bro. Hahn thanked the 
Worshipful Master and the Brethren for the very warm and sincere 



7 - 



reception. He paid tribute to The Heritage! ';.>'. v w C its ideals 
and then returned the gavel to the Worshipfi : Mi-.tc-r. 



AT THE ALTAR 

W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, Chaplain, approached the altar: 

"Edwin Markham once said: - "We have committed the Golden 
Rule to memory; let us now commit it to life! We have 
preached brotherhood for centuries; we now need to find a 
social and economic basis for brotherhood." 

In the words of St. Peter: "You should all be of one 
mind living like brothers, with true love and sympathy for 
each other, generous and courteous at all times. Never pay 
back a bad turn with a bad turn or an insult with an insult, 
but on the contrary pay back with good. For this is your 
calling - to do good and one day inherit all the goodness 



of God. " 



LET US PRAY 



1 Peter 3: 8, 9 (J.B. Phillips) 



Almighty God, this is Thy world, with goo'l and evil struggling 
for mastery. Help us, we pray, to overthrow the evil counsel of 
godless leaders, that wars and divisions may riot again blast the 
rightful hopes of men to live in peace. Quicken us in loyalty to 
Thee. 

Forgive our harsh ways with each other. Undermine the crude 
sway of hate by increasing us in charity, the bond of perfectness. 
In Thy wisdom guide and inspire the work of all who seek Thy will, 
that a new light may be seen, a new hope born, a new enthusiasm 
for peace released. Reveal to the nations that their security is 
not in force of arms, but in just dealing, in a willingness to 
forgive past wrongs, to repeat present bitterness and suspicion, 
and to claim their unity in Thee and in Thy Kingdom of brotherhood. 
Amen. 

SO MOTE IT BE 



The Worshipful Master then called on R. W.Bro. Charles Grimwood 
to say a few words in memory of R. W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie, a 
Charter Member and first Tyler of The Heritage Lodge, who passed 
to the Grand Lodge above on January 17, 198 0. 

R. W.Bro. Grimwood, while directing his gaze to the beautiful 
oil painting in the West, reminded the Brethren that it was M.W. 
Bro. Otto Klotz who put into words the characteristics of the 
Perfect Freemason and it was to the Ideal that R. W.Bro. McVittie 
dedicated his life. We Cherish his Memory in our hearts. 



The Prayer was given by Rev. Rivers. 



PAPER PRESENTATION 

The Guest Speaker, R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey was introduced 
by V.W.Bro. J. Pos. 

Brother Sankey is a Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge and 
has contributed greatly to the scholarly activities of our Lodge 
Program. He was elected D.D.G.M., Niagara District A in 1968; 
and has been a member of the Board of General Purposes from 197 
to date. We are indebted to Bro. Sankey for his summarization of 
more than 50 Proceedings of other Grand Lodges as they appear in 
our Fraternal Reviews each year. 

He is a P.G.S. So j . , and former Chairman of the Bursary 
Committee of the Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons of Canada in 
Ontario. 

He was elected T.P.G.M. of Elgin Lodge of Perfection, Niagara 
Falls, in 1950; and is now an Active Member of Supreme Council of 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, and Chairman of the Committee 
on Rituals and Ritualistic Matters. 

Brother Sankey is a Chemical Engineer, was Chancellor of 
Brock University from 1969 to 1974 inclusive and Retired as Vice 
President, Research, Ontario Paper Co. 



AN OVERVIEW OF SCOTTISH RITE RITUALS AS FORMULATED BY ALBERT PIKE 
FOR THE FIRST THREE DEGREES OF FREEMASONRY 

BY 

R.W.BRO. CHARLES A. SANKEY 



The Supreme Councils of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite 
of Freemasonry derive their legitimacy and authority ultimately 
from the Supreme Council established in Charlston, S.C. in 1801. A 
principal antecedent body of that Supreme Council was "The Rite 
of Perfection" in France, an organization which had, itself, 
evolved into a system of 25 degrees, including the first three 
degrees. Albert Pike, when Sovereign Grand Commander of the 
Southern Jurisdiction U.S., A. & A.S.R. prepared rituals for these 
three "Craft" degrees, in English and based on this earlier French 
tradition. The writer has access to Pike's text in a bound volume, 
published in A.M. 5632 (A.D. 1872) the property of Supreme Council 
33° A. & A.S.R. of Canada. 

The title page of this volume (9" x 5") has, in addition to 
inscriptions in Hebrew and in Phoenician characters, two headings :- 

"The Porch and the Middle Chamber." 

"The Book of the Lodge." 

Within, the first 179 pages are devoted to "General Matters and 
Degree of Apprentice", "Fellow-Craft" carries on to page 243, and 
"Master" to page 34 3. Even with this length, the text does not 
contain any esoteric work (even in code) . The text refers, on 
several occasions, to Pike's essays on these degrees as published 



in "Morals & Dogma" as additional material to be read and studied 
by the candidate. (These three essays require 105 more printed 
pages in a book of the same size, but much more compactly printed.) 
Even if it were desired to do so, and if the esoteric work were 
available, the requirement of time would make any full exemplifica- 
tion of Pike's text in a single session per degree quite unrealistic 
to attempt. Our concern here is with an overview only. "Conferral" 
as contrasted with "exemplification", is not for consideration. 
It would be completely improper under Grand Lodge regulations and 
would be no less restricted by Supreme Council, who acknowledge and 
recognize the exclusive authority of Grand Lodge over the Craft 
degrees as well as having an overriding discipline within the 
Craft as a whole. 

The best information available to the writer is that no 
English-speaking Supreme Council has ever "conferred" these degrees 
under their auspices. Some Spanish-speaking Supreme Councils in 
South America and some other Supreme Councils have, in the past, 
conferred degrees of E.A. , F.C. , and M.M. Texts used by them are 
not available to the writer. Certainly they cannot be as long 
■as Pike's. It is of interest, however, that three Craft Lodges 
in Louisiana are authorized by their Grand Lodge to use a "Scottish 
Rite Ritual", Etoile Pollaire Lodge #1 in New Orleans and Persever- 
ence Lodge #4 in River Ridge (both working in English) and Cervantes 
Lodge #5 in New Orleans (working in Spanish) . 

Pike's text is much more than a mere translation of material 
"only to be found in the French language". He has not hesitated 
to add to this. 

"In preparing this Ritual, the Sov. Grand Commander of the 
Supreme Council of Charleston has used MSS. Rituals in his 
possession, and the 'Guide des Macons Ecossais', a printed 
work, for the Ancient and Accepted Rite; and MSS. Rituals 
and Regulateur Symbolique and the Regulateur des Macons for 
the Rit Moderne. He has derived much assistance from the 
Thuileur Universel, in MSS. of de 1 ' Aulnaye and the Ahiman 
Rezon of Georgia, the work of 111. Bro. Rockwell; and is also 
under obligation to the Ritual of Bro.. V.A. deCastro. The 
old work is here much enlarged;' and the lectures of instruc- 
tion have been in part written and in part compiled by himself. 1 

Pike is also specific as to the purpose of his ritual :- 

"This Ritual is intended for instruction only, in the States 
of the Southern Jurisdiction where there are no Lodges working 
in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; and to be studied 
and understood before investiture with the fourth degree." 

It is the introduction to these rituals that Pike gives his 
definition of Freemasonry : - 

"The true definition of the Free-Masonry of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite is this: It is an advance toward 
the Light; a constant endeavor, in all its degrees, to elevate 
the Divine that is in Man, the Spiritual portion of his 
compound nature, his Reason and his Moral Sense, above, and 
make it dominant over, and master of, the human, earthly, 
and material portions of his nature, his passions, and his 
sensual appetites." 

The set-up for the Lodge in each degree is elaborate with 
extensive paraphernalia. In the E.A. Degree there is, in front of 



- 10 - 

the Master and each Warden, a triangular table with a" naked sword, 
gavel, three lights and implements for writing. An equilateral 
triangle, with the letter Tod, is suspended from an arch over the 
Master's table. In the East there is also an altar of incense 
with tripod, censer and cups containing perfumes for burning, and 
an altar of ablutions with brazen laver. Altar cloths and hangings 
are bright blue, but the "curtains" for the Master's and Warden's 
tables are crimson. The Pentateuch is on the main altar. Several 
constellations are painted on the ceiling, 3 stars in the belt of 
Orion, 5 in the Hyades, 7 in the Pleiades and in Ursa major, several 
"royal stars" and five planets, Jupiter, Venus, Mercury, Mars 
and Saturn, the Sun in the East, the crescent Moon in the West and 
a 5-pointed star in the South. 

Remarkably, illustrations of the "Plan" of the Lodge, for 
each of the degrees, is lifted from the 1745 French exposure "L'ordre 
des Francs-Macons Trahi" . (This exposure is translated in "The 
Early French Exposures", ed. Harry Carr, published by Quator 
Coronati Lodge, 1971, pages 227-277.) 

Clothing is a square 14" x 14" lambskin apron ("under no circum- 
stances of cotton or linen") with no emblems or devices, tied with 
a tasseled blue cord, edged and lined in light blue. All wear 
white gloves. Dignitaries wear light blue scaves. Officers and 
brethren wear swords, steel hilted, and blue belts. 

In a "respectable Lodge of Apprentice Masons", the Master is 
"Venerable". Master Masons wear their hats. In the Opening, 
the V.M. confirms tiling and that all present are Masons, both 
via the S.W. , the brethren remaining seated "under the sign of 
order" while the Deacons pass from East to West. The S.W. gives 
the station of the J.D. and each of seven officers state their 
duty and the station of the next higher officer, J.D. , S.D., 
Secty. , Treas., J.W. , S.W. , (incl. the V.M.'s station and duty). It 
being delcared to be "high noon", the Lodge is then opened "In the 
name of God and of St. John of Scotland, under the auspices of 
Supreme Council -- etc." 

Candidates must be 

"of twenty-one years, - free born, - master of his own 
person and actions, - of some degree of education, at least 
able to read and write, - no domestic or servant of any class, 
- no professional gambler, - no one following any low, vile, 
abject employment, - no monk of Jesuit, - - - " 

When a proposal was submitted, each brother was given an 
opportunity to express his personal opinion, following which, by 
written secret ballot, any brother could demand "a committee of 
enquiry". Such a committee, appointed by the V.M. , remaind 
incognito (apparently even to themselves) and reported at the next 
meeting by another secret ballot, examined by the V.M. who had 
provided means of identifying ballots of the committee. Eventually 
a completely clear ballot was required for acceptance, if necessary 
in three stages in three successive meetings, 3 blackballs on the 
1st, 2 on the 2nd, and 1 on the 3rd effecting final rejection. 
This ballot was for the E.A. degree only. Separate ballots were 
taken later before conferral of the F.C. and M.M. degrees. 

The Candidate is brought to the Temple by his proposer and, 
seeing only one other brother, is placed in charge of a "preparer 
for initiation". Left alone in an interior basement room, he 



- 11 



symbolically meets trial by "Earth" as, seated on a coffin, he 
writes of his duty to himself, to his fellow creatures, to his 
country, and to his Creator and also prepares and writes his last 
will and testament. These being completed, he tastes salt, burns 
sulphur and tries to separate mercury in his hand into drops, thus 
symbolizing the separating and uniting processes in the Universe. 

After the Candidate's answers have been read and approved in 
Lodge, he is prepared, received and given a charge on Duty and on 
Masonic Obligation. 

"- - - The calamities of the present are the terrible price 
of the future. - - - It is always for the ideal, and for the 
ideal alone, that those devote themselves who do devote them- 
selves. - - - The old French said, ' Noblesse oblige ' . With 
us 'Maconnerie oblige'. That is our motto: MASONRY IS 
OBLIGATION. - - -" 

He then leaves the Lodge and, when he attempts to return, is seized 
by "Brothers of the Light" who drag him, as a spy, into the "Cave 
of Death" from which is is "rescued". 

"- - - It is thus, my friend, through dangers and difficulties 
that men attain initiation. So do false philosophies and 
specious plausible creeds, pretending to be Brethren of the 
Light, drag down the soul that listens to them into the Pit 
of Error. - - -" 

After prayer, the candidate is asked the traditional question, "My 
friend, in whom do you put your trust?". 

The next stage of the degree is "The Interrogation", in which 
the candidate is asked four questions, each of his replies being 
followed by a charge :- 

I "What thoughts occurred to you when you were buried in 
the bosom of the Earth and required to write your will?" 

"- - - It was hoped that you would remember that the 
Dungeon has ever been one of the chief instruments of 
Tyranny - - and that you would be inspired with a pious 
anger against all Despotism. - - - The first act of an 
oppressed people asserting its right to freedom - is to 
destroy the Bastilles. - - Initiation was constantly 
termed 'a new birth' - and, to be born again - one must 
first descend into the grave. - - Every symbol and all 
the ceremonials are replete with significance. - Let 
those who deem our ceremonies idle and ridiculous still 
think so. 

II Do you believe in one Supreme Being?" 

" - - - a Deity to Whom everywhere is Here and every- 
where is Now. - - Whose laws are not mandates of His 
will, but the expression of His Nature; not right because 
He enacts them, but which His will enacts because they 
are right. - - - 

III What do you understand by the word VIRTUE? 

"- - - yjr , in the Latin, means a man. - - The man is 
vir tuous, who is not without desires, appetites, instincts 
passions; but who is master of, and controls them. - - To 



12 



toil - without fee or reward - is viture. To sacrifice 
one's self for the country or Humanity is to obtain the 
highest eminence of virtue. - - -" 

IV What do you understand by the word VICE? 

"- - - It is the attribute of the soul which produces 
the habit of satisfying our desires. (Masonry works) to 
impose salutary restraints on the impetuous rush of the 
appetites. - - -" 

Before undertaking journeys of trial by the other three ancient 
elements, the candidate is advised of future promises of secrecy, 
of self-control and of acceptance of landmarks, and drinks from a 
consecrated cup in pledge of agreement. Details of the journeys 
are not given except that 3 circuits are made in each. The charges 
which follow them are printed: 

1st AIR 

"- - - Air is a natural and apt emblem of human life, with 
its crosscurrents, agitations, stagnations - electrical 
disturbances and equilibria, - - Progress is the mode of man. 
- - To be always peaceful belongs to Progress no more than 
to the air. - - The Inquisition imprisons Galileo, but the 
Earth still moves. - - 

As you have experienced the helplessness and abdication 
involved in being blinded and led by a guide, let no one 
hereafter lead you blinded in matters of faith, but in all 
things see for yourself and judge for yourself." 

2nd WATER 

"- - purification of the body by water became the symbol 
of purification of the soul. - - The Ocean has always been 
an apt symbol of the People, to whose service every Mason 
devotes himself." - - 

3rd FIRE 

"- - The Deity Himself was symbolized by all the ancient 
nations as LIGHT, FIRE or FLAME. - - - Purified by water and 
you are symbolically free of all stain of vice. It is a pledge 
on your part that you will continually strive to become so. - - 

The Candidate then seals his profession of faith with blood 

"The baptism of Blood is not a symbol of purification. It 
is the Baptism of Heroism and devotedness, of the Soldier and 
the Martyr - - - It reminds you of the Martyrs of all creeds, 
dying for their faith - - of the long roll of atrocities and 
murders sanctioned by religion, and deemed grateful service 
to a God of Love. - - -" 

A "charity" lecture follows and the candidate is asked for a 
donation to "the destitute wards of the Lodge". The amount given 
is appropriately acknowledged. 

The Candidate is advised that his Ob. is to follow, with the 
injunction: 



"- - If we should not exact the penalty, remember that the 
consequences of crime and wrong inevitably flow from them, and 
are eternal by the inflexible law of cause and effect." 

The S.W. instructs the candidate on how to approach the altar. 
After his Ob. , the candidate returns to the preparation room while 
the lodge is prepared to show by the dim light of "two pans of 
burning alcohol and resin" , a representation of the head of John 
the Baptist. He returns to see this, the brethren with drawn 
swords all pointing to him, while a charge is given on the causes 
and effects of abuses of arbitrary power, the story of the Baptist 
being used as an example. He again returns to the preparation room 
and, returning, "fully restored to light", sees the Lodge "in its 
most brilliant appearance", the brethren standing with sword points 
lowered. He receives instruction on the 3 great lights, is proclaimed 
to be an E.A. by the V.M. , who also presents his apron, his white 
gloves, white gloves for his lady, and is entrusted with the signs, 
grips or tokens, and words. He is told that the "Sacred Word" is 
to be given, "lettering it without preliminary" to the J.D. or 
Pursuivant at the inside of the door "whenever you enter the Temple". 
He then retires to be "reinvested with all whereof he was divested." 

On his next entrance the Initiate receives two Working Tools :- 

1st The Rule:- "The Rule is the natural symbol of accuracy in 

workmanship of strict definition and limitation , 
of Statutes and Laws - - " 

2nd The Gavel: "The Gavel symbolizes Force: the Force of Intellect, 
of Passion, Energy, Enthusiasm, - - of Truth, - - 
the immense Force of Ideas - -" 

Following this there is a long explanation of ceremonies, 
reviewing and sometimes expanding on everything that has happened 
to the Initiate from his first entry into the building. He is 
particularly directed to study Pike's essay on this degree in 
"Morals & Dogma". But:- 

"- - it is not yet time for you to know the meaning of the 
equilateral and right-angled triangles, of the tesselated 
pavement in alternate lozenges of black and white, of the 
number THREE so constantly presented to you. - - You must 
study, my Brother, be patient and wait." 

It is apparent from the text that both pillars are introduced 
in the E.A. degree. This is confirmed in Morals & Dogma. There 
is reference to an extensive catechism, to be taught to the Initiate 
by the Deacons, in 3 parts, - a review of the ceremony, an explana- 
tion of the same, and a description of the lodge and its furniture. 

After all this, the Initiate is welcomed with signs, battery 
and plaudit as a member of the Lodge, receives yet another charge, - 
"My Brother you are now a Mason - -", is invited to address the 
Lodge and last, is given the old "writing test." 

Before the Lodge closes, opportunity to speak is given to the 
Orator, - 

"Brother Orator, if you have any piece of Architecture prepared 
the Lodge will be gratified to hear it." 

Speeches by visitors follow, the box of Fraternal Assistance 



- 14 - 



is passed, minutes are read and prayer is offered. The section "To 
Close" begins (are surely this can apply only when there is no 
degree work) :- 

"When the work ends early, the Catechism of the Degree is 
gone through between the Master and Senior Warden before 
closing. " 

/ 
In his essay in Morals & Dogma, Pike uses the two working tools 
to set out the field in which Masonry must fulfill its mission. 

"Force, unregulated or ill-regulated - - is destruction 
and ruin. The blind force of the people is a force which must 
be economized and managed - - It must be regulated by Intellect. 

- - To attack the citadels built up against the human race by 
superstitions, despotisms, and prejudices, the Force must 
have a brain and a law. - - 

It is this very Force of the people that builds the fortifi- 
cations of tyrants, and is embodied in their armies, - - that 
sustains these despotisms, the basest as well as the best, 

- - Tyrants use the Force of the people to chain and subjugate. 

- - Constantly the people put forth immense strength, only 
to end in immense weakness. - - 

This Force, symbolized by the Gavel, when guided by, and 
acting within the limits of law and order, symbolized by the Rule, 
(can yield) liberty regulated by law, equality of rights under 
law, and brotherhood in duty, obligation (and) benefits." 

Pike equates the rough Ashlar to the people and the perfect 
Ashlar to the Ideal State. Within the ideal State there is equil- 
ibrium between the executive, the legislative and the judicial power, 
paralleling, in each, the Divine equilibrium of Power, Wisdom and 
Harmony. 

A description is given of the two columns and the meaning of 
their names. Ultimately J, or Y, meant the Active and Vivifying 
Energy and Force, while B meant Stability and Permanence in the 
passive sense. Apprentices kept their working tools in the column J. 

Pike rejects the concept of "three principal rounds" on the 
ladder as "modern and incongruous". There are 7 rungs on the ladder, 
which Pike relates to traditions of groups of seven in anc-ient 
religions and mysteries. 

The three great lights are universal :- 

"- - The obligations of the candidate is always taken on 
the sacred book or books of his religion, that he may deem it 
more solemn and binding; We have no other concern (in asking 
you) your religious creed." 

Pike continues to press his political theme :- 

"nations are not bodies-politic alone, but also souls-politic. 

- - Genuflection before the idol or the dollar atrophies the 
muscle and the will. - - Privilege, Exception, Molopoly, 
Feudality, springing up from Labor itself. - -" 

Considering the "lesser, or the Sublime Lights": - The Sun is 
the ancient symbol of the life-giving power of the Deity, the Moon 



- 15 



of the passive capacity of nature to produce, and "The Master of 
Life" the Supreme Deity above both. 



do: 



The Ornaments are interpreted in a different manner than we 

"The pavement - - symbolizes the Good and Evil Principles. 
- - Despotism - - Religious Liberty and the arbitrary Dogmas 
of a Church that thinks for its votaries and whose Pontiff 
claims to be infallible. 

The edges and border are (simply) necessary. - - If these 
have any symbolic meaning it is fanciful and arbitrary. - - 

The Blazing Star - - originally represented Sirius. It 
(later) became the image of Horus, son of Isis who was the 
universal nature. - - and (finally) the sign of the Magi 
blazing with a steady radiance." 

The Hebrew letter Yod is in the East, within a triangle over 
the Master. "Our French brethren place this in the centre of that 
Blazing Star". "It is to us, in this degree, the symbol of that 
unmanifested Deity, the Absolute, who has no name." 

The conclusion of Pike's essay focusses on struggle, on duty 
on ideals: 

"It is more difficult for a people to keep than to gain their 
freedom. - - Truth conquors slowly. There is wondrous vitality 
in Error. 

Masonry should be an Energy; finding its aim and effect in 
the amelioration of mankind. Socrates should enter into Adam 
and product Marcus Aurelius, in other words should bring forth 
from the man of enjoyments, the man of wisdom. - - 

Masonry - - has eternal duties - - to oppose Caiaphas as 
Bishop, Jefferies as Judge, Trimalcion as Legislator and 
Tiberias as Emperor. 

But the great command of Masonry is this: 'A new command- 
ment give I unto you; that ye love one another! He that saith 
he is in the light, and hateth his brother, remaineth still in 
darkness. " 

The 2nd degree opening includes reading minutes of "our last 
labors as Fellowcraf ts. " 

Before requesting his F.C. degree through the J.W., the E.A. 
must have attended five meetings of his Lodge for instruction. He 
ought to be 23 years of age. His request is considered in a F.C. 
Lodge, comments invited, and a clear ballot passed before the date 
of passing is fixed. 

The Apprentice, carrying a Rule, is examined in the Catechism. 
He is told that five years of study, specified by Pythagoras for 
his students, are to be represented by 5 circuits of the Lodge, each 
followed by instruction. The Rule is replaced by the Mallet and 
Chisel, the candidate is prepared and proceeds on the 1st Circuit :- 

"The Chisel - is the chief tool of the Sculptor (who) uses 
it with judgement and, with judgement, applies the Force of 
the Mallet. - - 



- 16 



The morality of Line and Rule, giving Honesty. Truthfulness, 
Punctuality, Puritanism, is not sufficient for the Fellowcraft. 
He needs the Chisel (for) Generosity, Courtesy, Amiability, 
Gentleness. - - 

To secure moral and intellectual freedom to an individual, 
or political freedom to a nation, is a work of Thought, Patience 
and Perseverance. - -" 

2nd Circuit: - The Mallet and Chisel are replaced with the 
Compass and Rule. 

" (during) the 2nd year the study was Geometry, to which 
Arithmetic is the introduction. - - - 

Whether by the Fellowcraft is meant an individual or a People, 
- - the elements of Mathematics must be understood and its 
problems demonstrated by figures traced by the Compass and 
Scale before they can be applied to surveying, navigation, - - 
astronomy. - - 

- - again the Divine interpenetrating the Human; By the Rule, 
LAW, by the Compass, EQUITY. - - -" 

3rd Circuit:- The Compass is replaced by the Crow or Lever. 

" (during) the 3rd year, the Apprentice learned how to move 
and place stones for the foundation of the building. - - 

Courage, resolution, firmness, persistence, - self-reliance 
are the chief ingredients of manliness. - - The great principles 
embodied in the Bill of Right and Magna Carta, - are the founda- 
tions of a free State. 

- - Force of Will is the great individual Lever, Force of 
Fubiic Opinion is the graat Level of a free State". 

4th Circuit::- The Square replaces the Lever 

"(during) the 4th year the Apprentice was employed in the 
erection of the body cf the edifice. 

The letter G is not displayed as the initial letter of the 
word GEOMETRY, but of the Greek word GNOSIS, Knowledge. 

In free countries Masonry must labor to maintain, perpetuate 
and improve free institutions. - - the right to the writ of 
Habeas Corpus. Respect for the law should be greater - - for 
it is the law made by themselves for themselves. The allegiance 
of willing hearts is beyond that of the bayonets. - - In the 
end all things are tested by the Square and Rule." 

5th Circuit:- The Candidate is divested of all working tools. 

"The 5th year - was devoted to Astronomy and Numbers - (and) 
the theory of Architecture. - -" 

It appears that a sword was presented to the Candidate at 
this point. There follows an "address" on Loyalty, tracing 
this form "chivalric blind devotion to the Monarch or Leader" 
through to "a. spiritual loyalty as at Thermopylae." 



- 17 - 

"Men die for Glory, Honor and Duty. The loyalty of the 
Knight to the leader and lady, of the Jesuit to his order 
and the successor of Loyola, — of the Crusaders to the Cross, 
were all developments of the Divine. - - 

No one yet knows the immense force of Loyalty to a Flag, to 
a free Government, to an idea. - - 

A sound morality depends on a healthy religious faith. To 
get that is one chief object of your last year of study. We 
shall, in time, come to resemble whatever God we believe in. 

- - Man becomes the image of the God of his creed. - - 

Every true word is the word of God. - -" 

The "Address" concludes with a sometimes bitter reflection on 
incompetence in politics and in public life, of slander, trickery 
and lies in political infighting and a plea for honesty (applying 
the Square and Rule) in the political field. 

The next section deals with the Tracing Board with many refer- 
ences to 3, to 5, and to 7. These include references to the State 
as well as those with which we are familiar :- 

"In the State, the 3 steps are Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, 

- - the 5, Executive Power, Legislative Authority, Judicial 
Interpretation, the Church, the Army. - -" 

The Ob. follows, then the communication of signs, words and 
tokens and the Candidate retires "to be reinvested with that whereof 
he was divested." 

On his return, he is told "Hereafter you will labor upon the 
pointed cubical stone, - - and will receive your wages at the column 
B" . He is presented with the working tools; the Square, the Level 
and the Plumb, equated to Power, Wisdom, Justice, each applicable 
to the State as well as to the individual. 

Finally, the Candidate is sanctified by the Cross, its lines 
never meeting when extended to the limits of the Universe, and with 
reference to the Crux Ansata and to the Tau Cross. "The Cross stands 
while the World revolves." 

The Candidate is proclaimed, acclaimed, expresses his thanks, 
is advised as to the Catechism, visitors speak, the box of fraternal 
assistance is passed and the Lodge of Fellowcrafts closed, the 
minutes being read during closing. 

Pike's essay on "The Fellowcraft" in Morals & Dogma is long 
and is not easy reading. More than a few of the many examples 
used to illustrate the point at issue are cast in a form which will 
arouse controversy. Regardless, there is much of real merit. Here 
are some excerpts :- 

"In the Ancient Orient - - the loftier aspirations of the 
Spirit - - were taught - - in the Mysteries. (Symbolism) 
endeavored to illustrate what it could not explain; to excite 
an appropriate feeling. - - 

A few hundred years ago a new Truth began to be seen; that man 
is supreme over institutions, not they over him. - - 



18 



The wiser a man becomes, the less will he be inclined to 
submit tamely to the imposition of fetters - - on his conscience 
or his person. - - 

In the ordinary affairs of life we are governed far more by 
what we believe than by what we know . - - A man's faith is as much 
his own as his reason is. His freedom consists as much in his faith 
being free as in his will being uncontrolled by power. 

To elevate the people by teaching lovingkindness and wisdom 
with power to 'him who teaches best; and so to develop the free 
State from the rough ashlar - - is the great labor in which Masonry 
desires to lend a helping hand. 

When SOLON was asked if he had given his countrymen the best 
laws, he answered ' The best they are capable of receiving '. This 
is one of the profoundest utterances on record, yet, like all great 
truths, so simple as to be rarely comprehended. - - So too with 
great men. The intellect and capacity of a people has a single 
measure - - that of the great men who Providence gives it, and whom 
it receives . 

Let no Fellow-craft imagine that the work of the lowly and 
uninf luential is not worth doing. There is no limit to (its) 
possible influences. - - - A peasant boy, guiding Blucher by the 
right one of two roads, the other being impassible for artillery, 
enables him to reach Waterloo in time to save Wellington from a 
defeat that would have been a rout. 

A Democratic Government undoubtedly has its defects, because 
it is made and administered by men, and not by the Wise Gods. It 
cannot be concise and sharp, like the despotic. - - Men are brought 
together, first to differ, and then to agree. - - Often the enemy 
will be at the gates before the babble of the disturbers is drowned 
in the chorus of consent - - Liberty can play the fool like the 
Tyrants. - - But however, palpable and gross the inherent defects 
of democratic governments, - - we need only glance at the reigns 
of Tiberius, Nero - - to recognize that the difference between 
freedom and despotism is as wide as that between Heaven and Hell. 

In a free country, human speech must needs be free and the 
State must listen to the maunderings of folly, and the screechings 
of its geese, and the braying of its asses, as well as the golden 
oracles of its great men." 

The essay concludes with a section on numbers in Masonic symbolism. 
Those included are two, three, four, five, seven, eight, nine, 
ten and twelve. 

In the 3rd degree, the Master is "Worshipful", the Wardens 
"Most Venerable", all brethren "Venerable". "At a reception" all 
M.Ms are dressed in black, "with a slouched black hat and weeper 
of crepe, white gloves, apron and blue sash". All wear swords 
and sit covered. The W.M. wears a long blue velvet mantle. 

Opening parallels previous openings, including reading of 
minutes. A F.C. , before requesting his M.M. degree through the 
S.W. ,, must have attended 7 meetings of his Lodge since his 2nd 
degree and be 25 years old, except by dispensation. His request 
is discussed in Lodge end a clear ballot is required before the 
date of his degree is fixed. A M.M. lodge may be opened directly 
without going through the 1st and 2nd openings. 



- 19 - 

The Preparation Room, "The Chamber of Reflection", is hung 
with dark grey cloth and lighted by one large yellow candle. 
There is an altar, and a small table with the Working Tools of 
the previous degrees, all broken. The items on and around the 
altar are indicated as being esoteric. Fifteen separate inscrip- 
tions are on the walls, e.g.: 

"Birth, Life, Death! God the Creator, Preserver, Destroyer" 

"It is the Dead that govern. The living only obey." 

"The dust returns to the earth as it was; and the spirit to 
God, who gave it." 

The candidate is left alone here to reflect and after "10 
minutes have elapsed" is given a charge by the M. of C.:- 

"- - Our food becomes part of our body, whether it be the 
fruits of the earth, or the flesh of beast, - - - that which 
is part of our body today is part of that of the bird or 
beast tomorrow. - - - The particle of matter that once was 
part of the body of Socrates - - - of Moses or of Mahomet, 
may today be part of yours or mine. - - - 

I promise you nothing. Does any progress really bring us 
nearer that Light, which is infinitely distant. - - Yet the 
Thoughts and Influences of men survive their mortal bodies; 
and that is an Immortality. - - -" 

The candidates entry into the Lodge (lighting very restricted 
and with the brethren, seated with drawn swords in rows with space 
for the candidate to pass behind them on his circuits) is a com- 
plicated succession of requests, refusals, examinations, more 
refusals, an obligation in the preparation room and finally admission. 
The first charge to him includes 

"The true object of Initiation was to be sanctified, and to 
SEE; that is, to have just and faithful conceptions of the 
Deity, the knowledge of which was the LIGHT of the mysteries. - - 

- - - Each Initiate must study, interpret, and develop 
(Masonry's) symbols for himself. - - - 

- - - The doctrines that assign to the Creator the passions, 
and so lower Him to the level of Humanity, prove that now, 

as always, the old Truths must be committed to a few, or 
they will be overlaid with fiction and error, and irretriveably 
lost. - - - to teach (all people) to believe in the absolute, 
supreme, unembodied Wisdom, is to present them, virtually, 
with Atheism. - - -" 

The first three of seven circuits follow each with esoteric 
ceremonies. "Remember now thy Creator" is recited during one of 
these circuits. Then:- 

" - - your soul has passed, symbolically, in its ascent 
towards its home, the spheres of Saturn, Venus and Jupiter. - - 

In SATURN, the Ancients said the Soul parted with its 
Falsehood and Deceit. - - Interrogate yourself and admit that 
you have too often, under temptation, been false and deceitful. 
- - You have touched 'what seemed to be a corpse' - - That 



- 20 - 

body represented a State once free - now dead. - - If you 
are a citizen of a free State, ask yourself if you have done 
nothing to destroy the State. - - If you have permitted the 
despotism of party or private interest to control your vote, 
you have not been guiltless. - - 

In VENUS were shaken off the sensual appetites and passions. - ■ 
Appetites and passions are the gift of God, - - but allowed 
to predominate, they become tyrants. - - When a just equilibrium 
is preserved between the appetites and passions, the moral 
sense and the Reason - - there springs a vigorous manliness, 
the source of Love, Effort, Heroism. - - Vice and Luxury have, 
in all ages, sapped the foundations of States. 

In JUPITER, avarice was abandoned. - - Wealth always tends, 
in prosperous States, to become the supreme good, - - money 
becomes a God. - - There may be avarice even of knowledge, - - 
a life sacrificed to subtle speculations - - is a life wasted. 
- - The more gifts one has received the better use Providence 
commands him to make of them." 

The next four circuits are referred to Mercury, Mars, the Moon, 
the Sun. 

MERCURY removes inclination to Injustice and Hypocracy. - - 
Nothing is so difficult for a man as to be entirely just. - - 
We need no other definition of Justice than that of the Great 
Teacher who gave his name to a religion that now too commonly 
repudiates his precepts: 'All things whatsoever ye would 
that men should do to you, do ye even so to them. ' - - As 
a citizen of the State, help to cast out of office and power all 
who flatter the people, and mislead them to betray them. - - 

In Mars, the soul parted from the vices of Revenge, Anger, 
Ingratitude, Impatience and Querulousness. - - After all is 
it not better to have suffered than not to have lived at all. 

In the MOON we lay aside prejudices and preconceptions. - - 
Disputes about creeds are generally disputes about what neither 
party understands. The less one comprehends his creed - - 
the more he will be oracular and dogmatical - - the more zealous 
persecuter. - - The greatest of wrongs and follies is to attempt 
to propagate truth by the sword. - - 

In the SUN, the soul releases its aspirations for greatness 
and Empire. - - Let every Mason be content to be Monarch over 
himself.' - - 

In the sphere of the Sun, you are in the region of LIGHT. 
(God) covers Himself with Light as with a garment, and makes 
His Angels Spirits. - - His word is a lamp to the feet and a 
light to the path of the Faithful, - -" 

After the Obligation, which follows the last charge, the candidate 
is advised in general terms as to future trials and then enters into 
the complete, detailed and dramatic exemplification of the Hiramic 
legend, first as representative in the essential details, then "in 
sight and hearing" of the entire legend, including the travels of 
the Fellowcraft Lodges. 

A very long "final instruction" follows the drama:- 



- 21 - 

"- - Life is a school for the Soul; an arena in which, amid 
calamity, suffering and evil, it may learn to practice the 
manly and heroic virtues." 

The legend is closely related to the Mysteries. It "was meant 
to be identical at bottom with that of Osisis, regenerated as Hor-ra" . 
Close parallels are drawn with other traditions, including the 
Christian. 

The legend is also given a political interpretation. The 
Master HUROM is a symbol of THE PEOPLE and hence of LIBERTY. The 
broken tools show that the Rule can become (a symbol of) Arbitrary 
Power, the Square of Pontificial infallibility, the Mace of Military 
Force, the instruments and weapons by which people are enslaved. 

There is an explanation of many symbols, including the bee-hive 
the three steps, the pot of incense, the ark, the hour-glass, the 
scythe, the anchor, as well as those familiar to us. As to working 
tools: - 

"The working tools of a Master Mason are not given alike, 
even in the same Rite. Some say they are the Holy Bible, 
Square and Compass. Others that there is but one, the Trestle Board, 
others use the Trowel and Sword. - - The Trowel is the chief 
working tool of the Master." 

There is even one reference to reincarnation:- "We are passing 
through this world into other worlds, perhaps into other bodies." 

At the end of the "instruction" the 5 points of fellowship 
are communicated and explained. 

"To meet with all men upon the Level, to act with them 
according to the Plumb, and to part with them upon the Square, 
are the requisitions of the law of Masonry." 

As in previous degrees, the Candidate is proclaimed, acclaimed 
and "the new Master responds". Instruction is given (no details) 
and the Closing parallels that of the other degrees. 

Pike's tremendous essay on "The Master" is primarily directed 
to establishing the very close relation between the Hiramic legend 
and the Ancient Mysteries (especially of Egypt) , with the Pythagorian 
teachings, and with the Kabalah. It really has to be read to be 
appreciated. 

" All religious expression is symbolism; since we can 
describe only what we see, and the true objects of religion 
are The SEEN. - - All language is symbolic, so far as it is 
applied to mental and spiritual phenomena and action. - - - 

Mystic shows and performances were not the reading of a 
lecture, but the opening of a problem. Requiring research, 
they were calculated to arouse the dormant intellect. - - the 
alteration from symbol to dogma is fatal to beauty of expres- 
sion, and leads to intolerance and assumed infallibility. - -" 

The various glamours, from which the Initiate was symbolically 
purified in the 7 circuits are reviewed, especially with reference 
to the State. 



The name "Hiram" is, in Pike's view, more properly "Khur-om". 
The syllable "Khur", or its near variants, is, in many ancient 
languages, associated with the Sun. Pike translates the Hebrew 
word "Khur" as "an aperture of a window", or as "the eye", or 
as the colour "white". He translates the Parsi word "Khur" as 
"the literal name of the Sun". OM is, of course, even today, a 
name in use to symbolize the Supreme Deity. On this basis, Hiram 
becomes the aperture of a window to God, a personification of Light, 
a representation of the much desired Mediator, a Redeemer, a Savior 
of Mankind. 

Pike's careful consideration of the Egyptian tradition's rela- 
tion to the legend is simply summarized by a hieroglyphic which 
he reproduces. If this is not a fake, and we may take it that Pike 
considered it valid, we need nothing more to establish a significant 
link. 




A small portion of the Pythagorean concept is especially 
pertinent: - 

"Pythagoras defined God: a Living and Absolute Verity 
clothed in Light. 

"He said that the Word was Number manifested in Form. 

God, he said again, is the Supreme Music, the nature of 
which is Harmony - - - 

Order always manifests itself by threes. There is the 
word simple, the word hieroglyphical, and the word symbolic: 
in other terms there is the word that expresses, the word that 
conceals, and the word that signifies; - - the whole hieratic 
intelligence is in the perfect knowledge of these three degrees, 

The text dealing with the Kabalah includes :- 

"What is certain, even for science and the reason, is that 
the idea of God is the grandest, the most holy, the most use- 
ful of all the aspirations of man. - - 



Moral Evil is Falsehood in actions; as Falsehood is Crime 
in words. - - The Word of God, which creates the Light, seems 
to be uttered by every Intelligence that can take cognizance 



23 - 



of Forms and will look. 'Let the Light BE! ' . The Light, in 
fact, exists, in its condition of splendor, for those eyes 
alone that gaze at it; and the Soul - - seems to utter, as 
God did on the dawn of the first day, that sublime and creative 
word, 'BE! LIGHT! ' . 

The true name of Satan, the Kabalists say is that of Yehvah 
reversed. 

A Spirit that loves Wisdom and contemplates the Truth close 
at hand, is forced to disguise it to induce the multitude to 
accept it. - - " 

It is to be perhaps regretted (although it was the fashion of 
his day) that Pike concludes his essay on a bitterly polemical 
note:- 

"So Masonry jealously conceals its secrets, and intentionally 
leads conceited interpreters astray. There is no sight under the 
Sun more pitiful and ludicrous at once, than the spectacle of the 
Prestons and the Webbs, not to mention the later incarnations of 
Dullness and Commonplace, undertaking to 'explain' the old symbols of 
Masonry, and adding to and 'improving' them, or inventing new ones, 
- - and then giving a valid interpretation of the whole, so pro- 
foundly absurd as actually to excite admiration." 



It is apparent that there are two essential differences between 
the old French tradition, as interpreted and expanded by Pike, 
and that with which we are familiar for the E.A. , F.C., and M.M. 
degrees. 

First is the concept that the Temple, symbolized as an ideal 
to be built and actualized, should be reflected not just in the 
individual but in the State as well. That this was a salient part 
of FrenchFreemasonry of the time of the Rite of Perfection could 
hardly be questioned. The storming of the Bastille was a great 
climax in the struggle of a people for Liberty, Equality and Fratern- 
ity, and the incident, in all its aspects, including the Bastille 
itself is as French as France itself. Pike's emphasis of this theme, 
with his examples from America, was probably inevitable, because 
the ideals of the American political experiment were more vividly 
present in his day than they are now (mores the pity) and Pike was , 
gloried in being an American. And, after all, was he not right 
in his underlying thinking. None of us here would advocate direct 
political involvement as a Masonic Order . But, as individuals, we 
are weaklings and betray our finest convictions if we abandon 
political responsibility. 

The second is controversial, - that the tradition of Freemasonry 
comes primarily, if not exclusively, from the Ancient religions, 
mysteries and enlightenments. It may be noted that this view is 
not incompatable with that of Ward in his paper "The Birth of Free- 
masonry" A,Q,C, 9_1, 77-100, in which Ward strongly downgrades a 
background based exclusively on the Masonic Guilds. Pike's scholar- 
ship and erudition are awesome, so much so that we must guard against 
acceptance of his translations and explanations as infallible, when 
we have no scholarship of our own to judge them adequately. Pike, 
throughout his writings, consistently damned the idea of human 
infallibility and, in spite of his occasional polemics directed 
at those with whom he did not agree, would, I believe, have been 



24 



the first to deny his own infallibility. Perhaps the answer is to 
be found in that balance and equilibrium which is essential in 
trying to reconcile opposites. That Pike makes a case which merits 
the most serious consideration is unanswerable. 

Finally, I would hold that it is a proper function of Heritage 
Lodge to "look beyond the limits of particular institutions" 
including that of the Freemasonry with which we are familiar. This 
is a way to knowledge, this is a way to understanding, this is a 
way to integrating both our knowledge and our understanding of our 
beloved Order into ourselves. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: R.W. Brother Sankey, kindly abbreviated the major 
portions of the above paper and adjusted his pre- 
sentation to accommodate a listening audience, using 
a few projected pictures for illustrative purposes. 
However, the original paper is reproduced herein in 
its entirety so that all our readers may benefit 
from Bro. Sankey' s scholarly research. 



REVIEWS 

1. By W.Bro. Bert A. Mennie, Deputy Grand Governor of 

Ontario for the York Rite Sovereign College and Charter 
Member of The Heritage Lodge 

The draft of this paper presents the results of considerable 
study of Albert Pike's "The Porch and Middle Chamber and the Book 
of the Lodge" , and "Morals and Dogma" . With the former I have 
only become acquainted in this paper; with the latter I have attempted 
on more than one occasion before to become familiar, one of my 
copies being a first edition given me by my brother-in-law, but 
like Browning's "Sordello" most of it eluded my grasp. The writer 
of the paper has persevered to the end of the Third Degree finding 
"Pike's scholarship and erudition awesome...". 

R.Wor.Bro. Charles Sankey is to be congratulated on his research 
into these volumes bringing the substance to those who receive his 
paper in and from the Heritage Lodge, because most of us will 
never pursue it to the end in the original. 

The author's study of the "Ritual" which Pike claims to have 
taken from French sources with additions of his own is indeed 
comprehensive. The reviewer feels that the complications of Pike's 
rituals with the plethora of symbolism would be overwhelming and 
its effect partly lost on the average Mason, although some of this 
symbolism occurs in other orders with limited membership interested 
in this sort of thing, such as Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia. 
The author speaks of an elaborate means of dealing with proposals 
for membership in each of the three degrees, while some of this 
symbolism may add to the features of other Masonic bodies, it seems 
apparent that the membership of Craft lodges would find the meeting 
tedious and parts redundant. This may be one of the reasons why 
Pike's ritual has not found favour in the United States and Canada, 
our Grand bodies obviously preferring the more straightforward 
York ritual for the first three degrees. 



- 25 



While Pike's attempt to connect his rituals to the "Ancient 
Mysteries, especially that of Egypt, with the Pythagorean teachings 
and with the Kabalah" is interesting conjecture, it is unlikely 
that any present day Masonic scholar would seriously consider 
attempting to prove such a connection with the three degrees of 
the Craft lodges. We are aware of Bro. Harry Carr's opinion of 
such scholarship. 

This reviewer feels that he like the average Mason, prefers 
his monthly meetings in the Craft lodges to follow the simple yet 
dignified ritual and to leave other symbolism and flights of 
imagination to meeting in other bodies. 

2. By W.Bro. George Blackie, Charter Member of The Heritage 
Lodge 

R. W.Bro. Sankey has brought to light a subject matter that 
possesses many facets. The content of his paper conveys a vast 
array of information and covers an extensive period of time and 
contributes to every masons philosophical understanding of his craft. 

The sources he has availed himself of are superlative and we 
scan the material contained in the paper we are impressed again 
and again by the meticulous scholarship of Albert Pike and realize 
the depth and quality of his erudition. 

R. W.Bro. Sankey has shown to us the essential elements of 
the philosophical base of the three craft degrees not only in their 
Grand Lodge character but also as they relate to the philosophy 
of the ancient and accepted Scottish Rite; this latter aspect will 
be more apparent to Scottish Rite Masons. When we consider that 
Albert Pikes' book "Morals and Dogma" consists of 861 pages of fine 
print filled with every aspect of the history, philosophy and 
scholarship that lies within our ritual one wonders how he has so 
successfully accomplished the difficult task of communicating the 
main content of this essential knowledge to us. 

The extent of his paper even in this condensed form completely 
conveys to us the magnificent breadth of the subject. I am led to 
consider that perhaps the paper should be in two parts: 1. The 
History, and 2. The Philosophy. 

The content of the paper guides us to an awareness of the 
international and political aspect which exists within the phil- 
osophy of the ritual of the Southern Jurisdiction of the Supreme 
Council of the Thirty Third Degree of the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite in comparison with that which exists within the 
ritual of the craft degrees. This in itself should lead us into 
the endless examination and study of basic History, the beginning 
of Ethics, and the Concept of Social conduct, as they relate to 
our craft. 

For my own part I am addicted to this particular aspect of 
study and I am grateful to R. W.Bro. Sankey for having made me 
aware of this new and wonderful vista which I am sure will keep 
me occupied for some time to come. 

R.Wor.Bro. Sankey has indicated that he was unable to locate 
any text that might have been used by some Spanish speaking and 
other supreme councils. If he is not already aware I would recommend 



26 



to him Peterson's "The Latin Craft" it is a most complete text on 
this subject and was presented by Norman D. Peterson to the Grand 
Lodge AF and AM of Oregon on January 15, 1975. The text was also 
reviewed in the spring of 1975 by the Washington Masonic Quarterly 
and the April edition of the Philalethes magazine carried it as a 
feature article. 

We should commend R.W.Bro. Sankey for the depth of his research, 
his apt treatment of complex materials and thank him sincerely 
for having guided us to a new and exciting aspect of masonic study. 

3. By R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls, President of the former 
Canadian !-4asonic Research Association and former Editor 
of the Grand Lodge Bulletin 

From the text, page 9, we are informed "This Ritual is intended 
for instruction only, ...". Are there any lodges in the world, with 
the exception of those in New Orleans, that use this ritual today? 
This might be made clear in order to place the explanation in the 
proper context. 



INFORMATION DISCUSSION 



Following the formal reviews, the Worshipful Master invited 
informal discussion from the Brethren. 

R.W.Bro. Sankey - Requested that the Brethren should not 
consider Pike's work as an alternative to existing rituals, but 
rather to consider that his intention in reviewing the various 
histories and exposures, and in looking beyond particular institu- 
tions, was to put together a ritual primarily for instruction and 
discussion, and that it was never intended to be used in practice. 

W.Bro. LeGresley - If it wasn't to be used, I can't understand 
why he went to so much trouble to put together such an elaborate 
structure? 

R.W.Bro. Sankey - Since Scottish Rite Freemasonry had its 
beginnings in France, a country not entirely familiar to many 
American Freemasons, Pike wanted to be sure that his audience was 
familiar with its origins and background. 

R.W.Bro. Sparrow - Could you tell us something more about 
Albert Pike the person, who was he? 

R.W.Bro. Sankey - Professionally, he was a lawyer and soldier, 
born at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1809 and died in 1891. Brother 
Pike was elected the Sovereign Grand Commander of the Southern 
Supreme Council, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in 1859. He 
was Provincial Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the Royal Order 
of Scotland in the United States, and an honorary member of almost 
every Supreme Council in the World. His standing as a Masonic 
author and historian, and withal as a poet was most distinguished, 
and his untiring zeal was without parallel. 



- 27 



V.W.Bro. Pos - I understand that in those areas where there 
are no craft lodges nor in those areas not served by or under any 
Grand Jurisdiction, that the first three degrees can be conferred 
by a Lodge of Scottish Rite Freemasonry; in such circumstances 
what form of ritual would be used? 

W.Bro. Emery Gero - In discussing Freemasonry in European 
countries mentioned that many of them based the work in the first 
three degrees on the work in the Scottish Rite. However, the 
basic difference between their rituals and those in North America 
is that the former place more emphasis on the spiritual aspects, 
and the latter more on the moral aspects of human behaviour. 

R. W.Bro. Sankey - In summarizing the various discussions stated 
that some Scandanavian Lodges have eleven degrees in the 
Craft Lodges. Bro. Sankey said he was personally aware of several 
traditions that have survived namely: i) the Royal Arch Degree 
itself had its beginning in England and its greatest influence on 
Craft Lodges in England; ii) the French tradition has its present 
day successor in Scottish Rite Freemasonry; iii) we all share a 
common creed, and the recognition of a supreme being; iv) on the 
universal brotherhood of man. 

The Worshipful Master thanked Bro- Sankey for his comprehensive 
research and the excellent manner in which it was presented. This 
was heartily supported by the applause of the Brethren. 

The Worshipful Master then called on R. W.Bro. Hahn for his 
views and comments, who thanked the Brethren for a very pleasant 
evening. He congratulated the Lodge for an excellent program 
and the very special contribution it was making to Freemasonry in 
Ontario. In his report of the Lodge, he was pleased to note that 
The Heritage Lodge was not only in excellent condition with regards 
to its books and financial structure, but also in its very healthy 
growth and that the Lodge affairs appeared to be in good hands. 
Bro. Hahn reminded the Brethren of several upcoming activities which 
are included in the section on "Coming Events". 

Bro. Hahn thanked the Lodge for a wonderful evening, "it was 
very informative and a real inspiration to every mason present. 
This very unique lodge has a terrific potential and will achieve 
greatness from now on till time immemorial. The Grand Master must 
be pleased and proud to have such a lodge in this Grand Jurisdiction 
and I am proud to have such a lodge in Waterloo District". 

At this time, W.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, Worshipful Master of 
Concord Lodge No. 722 presented the Waterloo District travelling 
Square and Compasses to R. W.Bro. Donald Grinton, which was to be 
passed on the following night when Preston Lodge No. 297 receives 
its official visit from the D.D.G.M. 

Before resuming the Regular Business of the Lodge, the Worship- 
ful Master permitted any brethren wishing to retire to do so and 
extended an invitation to the visitors to remain in the Lodge if 
they wished. Returned to the next order of Business at 10:15 p.m. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 



R. W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, Chairman of the Committee reported 
that the members of the Committee met on February 20, 1980, and 



as all the Lodge Officers and Chairman ol the Standing and Appointed 
Committees had received a copy of the minutes of the meeting, he 
would not expand upon them at this time. However, he did remind 
all Committee Chairmen to come prepared for the next meeting to be 
held on April 9th, 1980. Only written reports would be discussed. 
In addition, several important subjects would be discussed and 
recommendations prepared for presentation to the Lodge namely: 
i) Change of Lodge Meeting Night; ii) Possible change of Lodge 
Meeting Place, iii) Life membership; iv) Special Exhibit at Grand 
Lodge in July; and formation of a Masonic Heritage Foundation. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 
/ 
The Worshipful Master, in receiving the correspondence, instruc- 
ted the Lodge Secretary to issue the requested Demit for W.Bro. 
Joseph Vliehs. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Sparrow, seconded by R.W. 
Bro. Drew, that R. W.Bro. W. Ed Wilson represent The Heritage Lodge 
at the next meeting of the Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corp- 
oration to be held at the temple March 29th, 1980, at 2:00 p.m. 
Carried. 

R.W. Bro. Sparrow enquired as to the procedure for visiting 
Lodges on the Waterloo District Inter-Lodge Visitation Program 
since The Heritage Lodge does not normally confer degrees. He 
also suggested that the members of Wilmont Lodge No. 318 may wish 
to make a presentation on the occasion of their Fraternal visit 
in May. 

V. W.Bro. Pos responded that the arrangements for the Regular 
Meeting on May 21st, 1980, was well in hand, and that the visiting 
Brethren should be prepared to spend a relaxing evening with no 
responsibilities and simply enjoy the program and participate in 
the informal discussions in the lodge room and the fraternal fellow- 
ship in the banquet room. We shall look forward to a large represen- 
tation for a meeting of profit and pleasure. 

Following a few brief announcements, and an invitation from 
the local arrangements Committee to join in refreshments and 
fellowship, the Lodge was closed in harmony at 10:37 p.m. 

J. Pos, 
Secretary. 



COMING EVENTS 



APRIL 9, 1980 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee Meeting in 

the Preston-Hespeler Temple, at 7:30 p.m. A large turnout is 
essential as many important resolutions will be prepared for 
the future of the Lodge. 

APRIL 27, 1980 (Sunday) - Waterloo District Divine Service to be 

held in Zion United Church, New Hamburg, Ontario at 7:00 p.m. 

Brethren to assemble in the Church Assembly Hall at 6:30 p.m. 
Regalia to be worn. 



29 - 



MAY 2, 1980 (Friday) - Brotherhood Lodge No. 723, will present the 
second Charles Fotheringham Memorial Lecture in the Kitchener- 
Waterloo Masonic Temple at 8:00 p.m. The Guest Speaker for this 
evening will be R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod , Chairman of the 
Grand Lodge Committee on Masonic Education. 

MAY 21, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 

Bro. John E. Taylor will present a paper titled "The Lodge Room, 
Lodge Furniture, Regalia and other Masonic Matters". Bro. 
Taylor is currently conducting research on another masonic 
subject in the Grand Lodge Library and Museum, London England. 
Brother Taylor has prepared a number of papers for the Canadian 
Masonic Research Association. 

JUNE 8, 1980 (Sunday) - A Special 125th Anniversary Project by 

Irvine Lodge No. 203, Elora, is a Memorial Service to honour 
the memory of M.W.Bro. Timothy Clark Wardley, Grand Master 
1943-1945. Service to take place in the Elora Cemetery at 11:00 
a.m. Bring the family for a picnic lunch in the Elora Gorge Park. 

JULY 13, 1980 (Sunday) - Grand Lodge 125th Anniversary Divine Service, 
to be held at the Bandshell, Canadian National Exhibition grounds 
Toronto at 3:00 p.m. Sermon "Affirming Our Heritage - Seeking 
the Future" - R.W.Bro. Keith Tudor, Grand Chaplain. Also the 
Speed Lodge Choir under the direction of R.W.Bro. James J. Spark. 

JULY 15, 1980 (Tuesday) - A Play - "THE BIRTH OF OUR GRAND LODGE", at 
2:00 p.m. in the Concert Hall, Royal York Hotel. Admission by 
ticket. 

JULY 16-1.7, 1980 (Wednesday & Thursday) - One Hundred and Twenty- 
Fifth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada. In the Province of Ontario, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:50 p.m. 
on Wednesday, there will be a "HERITAGE OF MASONRY DISPLAY" of 
exhibits of artifacts and memorabilia in the Royal York Hotel. 
Grand Master's Banquet at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, in the Canadian 
Room. The Guest Speaker, R.W.Bro. H.A. Leal, will discuss "NEW 
LAMPS FOR OLD". Entertainment . by the University of Guelph Choir. 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge, and the Annual Election of Officers. W.Bro. George 
Campbell, Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge will present 
a paper jointly prepared by himself and R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence 
Runnalls, titled "OUR GRAND MASTERS, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C., 1855- 
1980". 

NOVEMBER 19, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge, 
and the Annual Installation of the Worshipful Master and the 
Investiture of the Officers. 

Other Masonic Papers to be presented at future meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for example: 
Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, Rosicrucians , 
Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges formerly 
on the Register and now struck off, by Bro. John E. Taylor. 

3. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 



- 30 



4. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up-To-Date Review. 

5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian 
Chief by V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 



Other suggestions: 

1. Anti-Masonic Groups - individual, political, ecclesiastical 
etc., suggested by R.W.Bro. E. J. Burns Anderson. 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M. W. Bro. Norval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M. W. Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R. W. Bro. Lewis Hahn 
7 5 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 



LODGE OFFICERS 
1978-79 



W.M. 
I. P.M. 
S.W. 
J.W. 
S.D. 
J.D. 
1.6. 
S.S. 
J.S. 



R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 



Donald S. Grinton 
Keith R.A. Flynn 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
George E. Zwicker 
Galfour LeGresley 
David C Bradley 
C.E. Drew 
Robert Throop 
Albert A. Barker 



Tyler 
Sec'y 
A/Sec' y 
Treas. 
D.C. 
Chap. 
Organist 
Historian 



R.W.Bro. 
V. W.Bro. 



C.F. Grimwood 
Jacob Pos 



R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 

R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

W.Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 

R.W.Bro. L.R. Hertel 

W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar 



LODGE COMMITTEES FOR 197 9-8 



GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, (S.W.); 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, 

(J.W.): W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.): and R.W.Bro. David C. 
Bradley. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W.Bro. 

Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. Bert 
Mennie; and R.W.Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Robert Throop, (S.S.); 
W.Bro. Albert A. Barker, (J.S.); Local Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. C.E. 
Grimwood, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. Gary 
Powell; and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; and R.W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. James 
Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw; W.Bro. 
Paul Engel; and Bro. Kenneth Bartlett. 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 
Steel; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's name 
this is an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge By-Laws. 
The duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in Article VIII, 
Sections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for an annual budget. 



Instituted, ^tetntw 21,10?r 
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INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Donald G.S. Grinton, W.M, 
28 Cambridge Drive 
Brantford, Ontario 
N3R 5E2 
(519) 759-3182 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Avenue 
Guelph, Ontario 
NIG 2L8 
(519) 821-4995 



Vol. 03, No. 04 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



May, 1980 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting 
and General Purpose Committee Meeting; Proceedings of the Thirteenth 
Regular Meeting held on Wednesday, May 21st, 19 80; notice of coming 
events; and names and addresses of Lodge Representating in those 
Districts where members of the Lodge are located. 

NOTE: The opinions expressed by authors, reviewers and participants 
in the informal discussions presented in these Proceedings, 
are not necessarily those of the Lodge or its members. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Donald G.S. Grinton, 
you are hereby requested to attend the Fourteenth Regular Meeting of 
the Lodge to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple located 
at the North-East corner of the intersection of Highways No. 401 and 
No. 24 on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 17TH, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such business 
as may be regularly brought before the Lodge; this will include the 
several notices of motion as presented in these Proceedings. As 
this is our Annual Election of Officers, a large attendance is 
expected to give encouragement to those so elected. 

W.Bro. George Campbell, Charter Member of The Heritage Lodge 
will present a paper at the September Meeting. The paper is titled 
"OUR GRAND MASTERS, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C., 1855-1980" and was jointly 
prepared by R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnals and himself. A very timely 
topic during the 125th Anniversary of our Grand Lodge. 

The Reports of the Committees of Enquiry for the Applications 
for Affiliation as presented in the last Proceedings, Vol. 03, No. 
03, March 1980, all report favourable, and we shall therefore 
ballot on the following at the Regular Meeting, September 17, 1980: 



1. R.W.Bro. Edward Sidney Patrick Carsons; Age 51; Real Estate 
Broker; 87 Thornton Ave., London, Ontario. 

2. R.W.Bro. Wilbur J. Dickinson; Age 65; Retired; 18 Freeman Dr., 
Port Hope, Ontario. 

3. R.W.Bro. Charles Russell Harris; Age 63; Car Dealer; 31 
Johnstone Blvd., Walker ton, Ontario. 

4. V.W.Bro. Harold S. Anderson; Age 71; Retired; 1915 Fairport Rd., 
Pickering, Ontario. 

5. V.W.Bro. Frank William Chisholm; Age 68; Sheriffs Officer; 
Hornby, Ontario. 

6. W.Bro. Lancelot Francis Buttler; Age 61; Carpenter; 44 Langside 
Ave., Weston, Ontario. 

7. W.Bro. Barry Allan Douglas; Age 36; 102 Pinehurst Dr., Welland, 
Ontario. 

8. W.Bro. Charles Raymond Griffiths; Age 40; Plant Engineer; 18 
William St., Parry Sound, Ontario. 

9. W.Bro. Thomas Henderson; Age 35; Vice Principal; R.R.#2, Orono, 
Ontario. 

10. W.Bro. Jerry Michael Howarth; Age 42; Merchant; P.O. Box 400, 
Bancroft, Ontario. 

11. W.Bro. Donald Ion; Age 53; Design Engineer; 9 Barnes Ave., 
Brantford, Ontario. 

12. W.Bro. Donald Ross Moore; Age 43; Pharmacist; R.R. #3, 
Heathers Point, Brockville, Ontario. 

13. W.Bro. Maurice William George O'Neill; Age 51; Farmer; R.R. #1, 
Newtonville, Ontario. 

14. W.Bro. Stanley Lloyd Tonkin; Age 59; Manager; 4 4 Bay Street, 
Parry Sound, Ontario. 

15. Bro. Reginald Forest-Jones; Age 62; School Teacher; 464 
Manchester Rd., Kitchener, Ontario. 

16. Bro. Roy Dawson Gilder; Age 71; Retired; 172 Church St., 
Brockville, Ontario. 

17. Bro. Robert FitzGerald Gordon; Age 40; Economist; 2021 
Stonehenge Cresc, Ottawa, Ontario. 

18. Bro. Percy Rupert Harrison; Age 55; Firefighter; 192-6th Street, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

19. Bro. John Leonard Herron; Age 42; Adult Educator; 44 Hickory 
Place, Brantford, Ontario. 

20. Bro. James R. Hunter; Age 51; Maintenance Superintendent; 
255 Ridge Drive, Milton, Ontario. 

21. Bro. Paul Liscumb; Age 57; Retired; 12 Brookbridge Dr., 
Scarborough, Ontario. 



22. Bro. Malcolm John McKissack; Age 34; 23 Bendingroad Cresc, 
St. Catharines, Ontario. 

23. Bro. Thomas Nilbert Piatt; Age 76; Retired; 115 Amaranth St. W. 
Grand Valley, Ontario. 

24. Bro. Thomas Ross Silk; Age 47; Service Technician; 9336 Alten 
Street, Windsor, Ontario. 

25. Bro. David Peter Stanton; Age 42; Sales Manager; 7 3 Alexander 
Blvd., St. Catharines, Ontario. 

26. Bro. Russell John Varley; Age 35; 1414 Amber Cresc, Oakville, 
Ontario. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

The next General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 20TH, 1980, AT 7:30 P.M. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and Appointed 
Committees are urgently requested to attend. All members are 
particularly welcome. As several very important topics, which will 
affect the future operations of the Lodge, will be discussed at this 
meeting , it is hoped that a large number of masons will be present. 
All Chairmen of the various Committees are reminded that only those 
reports properly prepared and in writing will be accepted. Be 
prepared for a lively discussion. 



Sincerely and fraternally, 



V.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos, 
Secretary. 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Thirteenth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 
G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, 
Wednesday, May 21st, 1980, with 12 Officers, 34 Members and 13 
Visitors for a total of 59 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:30 p.m., with the 
Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton in the East. After 
welcoming the Brethren to the fourth Regular Meeting for the current 
year, the Worshipful Master announced that he would proceed directly 
into the Business Agenda and call the Lodge from labour to 
refreshment promptly at 7:55 p.m. to formally receive the visitors. 



- 4 



MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Wm. T. Boratynec, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, that the minutes of the Twelfth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge, held on March 19th, 1980, be adopted as 
circulated in the Lodge Proceedings (Vol. 03, No. 3). Motion 
carried. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The reports of Committees on Applications (26) for Affiliation, 
as listed on pages 4, 5 and 6 of the last Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 03 
No. 03, dated March, 1980, reported favourable. 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Alan N. Newell, seconded by 
W.Bro. George Zwicker, that the reports be received, the committees 
discharged and proper notice for balloting at the next Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge be included in the Lodge Summons. Motion 
carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From Mr. Sam Hay, 7 Croft Street, Tarbolton, Ayrshire, Scotland, 
dated March, 1980, announcing that a 70 page booklet titled 

"A Historical Review 1771-1976, Tarbolton Kilwinning St. James 
Lodge No. 135, S.C., has been printed. The Author is a P.M. 
of the Lodge, Also Mr. Hay has an etching of Robert Burns in 
Masonic dress, which hangs in the Bachelor's Club in Tarbolton. 
He is arranging through the National Trust for Scotland to have 
sepia's made for reproduction; which he is prepared to sell to 
raise funds for the Bachelor's Club. Cost may be.£ 8 to £10. 
Editor's note: I will order 3 copies of the Historical Review 
and enquire further re: sepias; and will report at next meeting 
in September. 

2. From Lena Eager la Vine, dated April 15, 1980, advising that 
her husband Lewis J. la Vine passed away January 29, 1980. 

3. From R.W.Bro. A.D. Grant, requesting a demit from the Lodge. 

4. From W.Bro. G. Kennedy, Secretary/Treasurer of the Worshipful 
Master's, Post Master's and Warden's Association of Waterloo 
District, in which he enclosed: Letter to each Lodge Secretary, 
Minutes of the Fall meeting, and a proposed Agenda for the 
Spring Meeting. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Robt. Throop, that the correspondence be received and 
processed in the usual manner. Motion carried. 



PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $628.81 were presented, and 
on a motion by R.W.Bro. James H, Hutchinson, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
David Bradley were passed and ordered paid: 

Secretary's Account: 

- Post Office Deposit Ace, Inv. #391905 $ 66.57 

- Postage up to May 21st, 1980 30.50 

- Stationary and supplies 17.92 
Mrs. Karen Perry; Fergus 

- Typing March Proceedings 32.00 
The House of Print, Guelph 

- Printing 1000 Information Leaflets, Inv. #10621 97.77 

- Printing 500 March Proceedings, Inv. #10622 345.53 
W.Bro. G. Kennedy, Waterloo 

- Lodge dues to Waterloo District, 1980 12.00 
W.Bro. Donald Kaufman, Kitchener 

- Refreshments for May Meeting 26 .52 

TOTAL $628.81 



RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for affiliation were received as follows: 

1. BAXTER, Clifford John, P.G.J.W.; 88 Redpath Ave., Apt. 1202, 
Toronto; Age 55; Meat Manager; member of Dentonia Lodge No. 651 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. David Bradley and W.Bro. Balfour 
Le Gresley. 

2. DUNLOP, Hugh Matheson, P.D.D.G.M.; R.R. #6, Dresden, Age 62; 
Farmer; member of Sydenham Lodge No. 255, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen and R.W.Bro. John Burnett. 

3. FOSTER, Jack Allister, P.G.R.; 323 Niagara Blvd., Fort Erie; 
Age 77; Retired; member of Palmer Lodge No. 372, G.R.C., 
recommended by V. W.Bro. R.E. Gardiner and R.W. Bro. R.E. Groshaw, 

4. RUNCIMAN, Robert Thomas, P.D.D.G.M.; 37 Glowcester Crt. , Sudbury; 
Age 46; Provincial Judge; member of Algonquin Lodge No. 536; 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey and V. W.Bro. 
Jack Pos. 

5. WEATHERDON, Francis Roy, P.D.D.G.M.; 968 Bricker St., Box 623, 
Port Elgin; Age 65; Retired; member of Port Elgin Lodge No. 429, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. E.J. Scarborough and R.W.Bro. 
Wm. A. Strutt. 

6. BAIN, Donald William, P.M.; 131 Campbell Ave., North Bay; 

Age 39; Real Estate Broker; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour 
Le Gresley. 

7. DALE, Jack, P.M.; 71 Salisbury Ave., Cambridge; Age 62; Retired; 
member of Concord Lodge No. 722, G.R.C.; recommended by 

W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers and W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman. 



6 - 



8. DOWN, Cordon Albert, P.M.; 1465 Tyneburn Cresc, Apt. 102, 
Mississauga; Age 54; Warehouse Manager; member of Wellington 
Lodge No. 635, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. P.E. Taylor and 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

9. FRASER, Kenneth Duncan, P.M.; 59 Nightingale Drive, North Bay; 
Age 49; Fire Fighter; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley and R.W.Bro. 
Ed Ralph. 

10. JOHNSON, Thomas Arch., P.M.; 542 Chester St., London; Age 68; 
Retired; member of Union Lodge No. 380, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson and R.W.Bro. A. Lou Copeland. 

11. JONES, Robert Denzey, P.M.; 46 Mikel Ave., Belleville; Age 67; 
Retired; member of Eureka Lodge No. 283, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop and R.W.Bro. W. Gordon Bunker. 

12. LIEBROCK, Richard Allan, I. P.M.; 2515 Grand Marais W., Windsor; 
Age 34; Sales Representative; member of Palace Lodge No. 604, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Thomas S. Crowley and Bro. James 
N. Hayes. 

13. M C SKIMMING, Ian Alexander, P.M.; 373 Detroit Street #509, 
Windsor; Age 33; Customs Inspector; member of Palace Lodge No. 
6 04, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. James N. Hayes and W.Bro. 
Thomas S. Crowley. 

14. MAVIN, Hilary F.J., P.M.; 1 English Rd., Chatham; Age 54; 
Teacher; member of Victory Lodge No. 563, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen and R.W.Bro. John Burnett. 

15. SMITH, Robert Joseph Thomas, P.M.; Ill Tweedsmuir Drive, North 
Bay; Age 43; Railway Clerk; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour Le 
Gresley. 

16. SMITH, William R. , P.M.; 997 Bruce Avenue, Windsor, Age 66; 
Retired (Bendix Corp.) member of Palace Lodge No. 604, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. Thomas S. Crawley and Bro. James N. Hayes, 

17. CHADBOURNE, John D., M.M.; 134 Lindsay St., North Bay; Age 46; 
Manager; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley. 

18. COLBERT, Arnold Russell, M.M. ; 272 Rita Road, North Bay; Age 32; 
Principal-Teacher; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley. 

19. DRURY, Neil Reginald, M.M.; 23 Beaver Cr., North Bay; Age 42; 
Plant Superintendant; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, G.R.C.; 
recori -ended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and V. W.Bro. Jack Pos . 

20. M c ISAA0, Arthur James, M.M. ; 31 Superior Cr., North Bay; Age 45; 
Financial Manager; member of Lacayan Lodge No. 8188, G.R.E.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley. 

21. PATTERSON, 7-vrthur Blackford, M.M. ; 11 Crescent Court, Lindsay; 
Age 63; Solicitor; member of Faithful Brethren Lodge No. 77, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. George Zwicker and V. W.Bro. Jack 
Pos. 



- 7 



22. THOM, Terrance John, M.M. ; Box 771, 340 Avery Dr., Espanola; 
Age 53; Teacher; member of Espanola Lodge No. 527, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. John E. Taylar and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos . 

23. VALE, Donald Victor Harold, M.M. ; 613 Norman Ave., North Bay; 
Age 36; Crown Attorney; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour 
Le Gresley. 

24. WEISMAN, Aube, M.M. ; 141 Cedarvale Ave., Toronto; Age 66; Linen 
Supplier; member of The Mount Moriah Lodge No. 727, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

25. WELIN, Lint Arthur, M.M. ; 455 O'Brien St., North Bay; Age 43; 
Clerk; member of North Bay Lodge No. 617, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley, seconded 
by W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, that the applications be received, the 
usual committees appointed and the names and particulars included in 
the next Lodge Summons. Motion carried. 

FROM LABOUR TO REFRESHMENT 

The Lodge was called from labour to refreshment at 7:55 p.m. for 
the space of 10 minutes. 

FROM REFRESHMENT TO LABOUR 

The Lodge resumed labour at 8:07 p.m. 

VISITORS 

At this time, R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow, D.C., was admitted into 
the Lodge to introduce W.Bro. Kenneth Root, Worshipful Master of 
Wilmot Lodge No. 318 accompanied by a number of Officers and Members 
of the Lodge on their Fraternal Visit. 

After the visiting Brethren were accorded the customary welcome, 
complete with Grand Honours, W.Bro. Root, assisted by the Officers 
of Wilmot Lodge, responded with a delightful ceremony in which four 
beautiful hand crafted wands which had been in use in Wilmot Lodge 
for more than 100 years, were presented on permanent loan to The 
Heritage Lodge. The presentation of each wand was accompanied by 
well chosen words commemorating the historic event and a sincere 
wish for another 100 years of continued use in this unique historical 
lodge dedicated to the preservation of our masonic heritage. This 
was followed by words of sincere appreciation and thanks from the 
Worshipful Master and the applause of the Brethren. 

SPECIAL RECOGNITION 

Another pleasant surprise was the introduction by R.W.Bro. 
Robert Throop of an outstanding Brother Mason who was born in a 
white farm house just outside of Oshawa on May 4, 1890. R.B.Bro. 
W. Gordon Bunker was initiated into Freemasonry in 1916, became 



Worshipful Master of his Mother Lodge in 1921 and D.D.G.M. of Ontario 
District in 1950. The Worshipful Master, before extending Grand 
Honours, complimented R.W.Bro. Bunker on his 64 years of dedicated 
service to Freemasonry and on his continuing activity in the Craft at 
90 years of age. 



PAPER PRESENTATION 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on V.W.Bro. Pos to 
proceed with the education portion of the program. Bro. Pos informed 
the Brethren that the Author of the paper to be presented that 
evening, Bro. John E. Taylor, was not able to be present because of 
complications following recent surgery which necessitated an 
unexpected return to the Hospital in Sault Ste. Marie; he therefore 
sends his sincere regrets. The following paper was then read by 
Bro. Pos. 



THE LODGE ROOM, LODGE FURNITURE, REGALIA AND 
OTHER MASONIC MATTERS 

by 

Brother John E. Taylor 

Some forty years ago, after I had received my Third Degree, I 
was talking to an English Mason in Dundas, Ontario, the subject being 
a Board of Trial which he had been given when he applied to enter an 
Ontario Lodge for the first time. His interrogator asked him: 
"What is there in the middle of the room?" and he was most 
disconcerted when the English brother replied, "Nothing." On then 
asking where the altar in an English lodge was placed, he was given 
the reply: "The Master's Pedestal is in front of the Worshipful 
Master in the East." 

Such is the uniformity in Ontario Lodge Rooms, and indeed with 
its ritual, that few master masons have the faintest idea of what 
goes on outside this jurisdiction: and even in the United States, 
where the lodge rooms look remarkably similar, most of our members 
are unaware of the fact that a "Due Guard" has to be used, different 
in each degree. They are usually most surprised to find that they 
have had to use this sign in their own degree work, but not under 
the same name. 

Grand Lodge Rooms 

I have made a canvass of those who should know best - our Past 
Grand Masters - and the consensus of opinion was that whilst most 
Grand Lodge offices were located in temples, very few temples were 
large enough to handle the number of delegates who attend. In 
consequence, Grand Lodges are held, as we do in Ontario, in large 
hotels. The most notable exceptions are those held in the temples 
in London, England, Washington and Philadelphia. The former, 
miraculously escaped bomb damage in World War Two. This building 
is almost a 'must' for visitors to London, and wives are as 
interested as their husbands in the museum, and are made welcome. 
The great bronze doors of the Grand Lodge room, each weighing a 
ton and a half, can be moved with the push of the little finger. 



- 9 



The Lodge Room 

Like the Grand Lodge room, there are certain common features, 
the Master's chair, and those of the Wardens; in North America, there 
is in the centre the altar, surrounded by Lesser Lights, and in 
England, the Master's pedestal is found in the East. From hereon all 
similarities cease. One lodge in Bermuda - the oldest - works the 
old Bristol Ritual, with an altar in the centre and three tall 
candlesticks and tall candles as lights. They also have the writing 
test after the Obligation. You should try this question on one of 
your Past Masters. The lay-out in New Zealand is somewhat different. 
On entering a lodge room two pillars are very close to the Senior 
Warden's chair, and in front on a tesselated pavement is placed a low 
altar with a V.S.L., whilst to one side is a case containing three 
tracing boards. The two Pillars are of course mentioned in degree 
work, and show on the Tracing Boards, but in many lodge rooms they 
are actually erected, usually in front of or near the Senior Warden's 
chair. 

Below the steps in the East is a cabinet with trays for the 
Working Tools of each degree and of course, the Ashlars rest on the 
floor. It may be observed before I continue, that the Tracing Boards 
in North America are open to view, whereas in England, Jersey and 
New Zealand they are exposed according to the degree in which the 
lodge is open. However, some Ontario Tracing Boards work on the 
roller blind principle, and are exposed only when in use. Again, in 
Ontario we have visible evidence of the Cardinal Virtues, but they 
are not even hinted at in the other lodge rooms. The ritualist who 
included these had an intimate knowledge of the writings of Plato. 

Customs vary in the entry of officers at the beginning of the 
meeting. Both in Canada and the United States of America, officers 
and members alike take their seats, and the Lodge is then officially 
opened. In the Grand Lodge of England the members take their seats, 
and officers then march in and take their respective chairs, the 
Master entering last, and also leading the way out when the Lodge is 
closed. The custom of seating in the East also varies. In North 
America it is reserved for Grand Lodge and Past Masters. In England, 
the Chaplain and I. P.M. have seats to the left of the Master, and 
seats to his right are reserved for visitors, of any masonic rank. 

The Broken Column 

At most masonic meetings in England - and elsewhere - there is a 
collection for a specific charity at each meeting, Ontario excepted. 
General charities vary according to each Grand Lodge, and a number of 
Grand Lodges in the United States, however, have Homes for the Aged. 
New Zealand also has such homes, but in that country only one inmate 
in three can be a member of the Order. In Ontario, the handling of 
masonic relief is somewhat subrosa, but a report is given every year 
at Grand Lodge. The actual subject of charity is mentioned only once 
in our degree work, and never practised in lodge. Now at last we 
have a fund to which we can give. The lodges under English 
jurisdiction used to support no less than four charities, but now two 
will be closed for reason of disuse or cost of operation. There 
remains the Royal Masonic Benevolent Institute and the Royal Masonic 
Hospital, and at every lodge meeting, the Almoner will take up a 
collection, the one at the annual installation ceremony being 
especially designated for the Hospital. A further word about the 
Hospital is in order. It is available to all masons and their 
families from anywhere should illness strike; and especially if the 
illness begins in Europe, arrangements can be made to bring the 
patient to the Royal Masonic for care and attention. 



- 10 - 

The Lewis 

We all know, or should know, that a Lewis has two meanings. The 
first refers to the son of a mason, who in some Grand Lodges not only 
may be initiated at the age of eighteen, but also has precedence over 
other candidates. The word also refers to a winching device used to 
lift stones and help them into place. Again, not every lodge room 
has one, but I well remember the one by the Senior Warden's Chair in 
the old Hamilton lodge room before fire destroyed the building. 

Lodge Banners 

A hundred and fifty years ago it was quite usual for a lodge to 
have its banner, but they are now things of the past, and only the 
older Ontario lodges ever had them. 

The last item which I shall mention is not in any lodge room, 
but is part of the banquet after the lodge work is done. I refer to 
the Tyler's Toast. I have no recollection of every having seen it 
given in North America, but it is such a fitting conclusion to a 
masonic evening, that I shall quote from Harry Carr's book - "The 
Freemason at Work", on page 183. The Tyler, standing behind the 
W.M. pronounces the time honoured words: Brethren, by commands of 
the Worshipful Master I give you the Tyler's Toast: "To all poor 
and distressed Freemasons wherever scattered over the face of land or 
sea: wishing them a speedy relief from all their sufferings and safe 
return to their native land if they so desire." 

REVIEWS 

1. By W.Bro. Wm. T. Boratynec, Post Master of Prince of Wales Lodge 
No. 630, Toronto, and a member of The Heritage Lodge No. 730. 

First of all I would like to congratulate Brother John E. Taylor 
on the subjects dealt with. In reading the paper I realized how 
inadequate it would be to comment on opinions expressed as I felt 
unqualified to judge with propriety on his opinions. Brother Taylor 
should be praised for his research and giving us information which is 
very timely and points out the differences in various jurisdictions 
and should serve to alert visitors as to what they may expect when 
attending a Lodge in a different jurisdication. Too little is being 
done in most of our Lodges to acquaint our Brethren with customs and 
procedures they may have to cope with when attending other Lodges. 
Too many of our newly initiated members are left on their own to 
learn the 'secrets and mysteries' of Freemasonry. 

The reference to the Due Guard should have been a little more 
elaborate. Too little information is being dispensed among the 
Brethren on this subject, and most of our new members have to learn 
it the hard way. 

Brother Taylor's topic on the Lodge Room deserves commendation 
as nowhere else have I found so much information in so little space 
alloted to the subject. The reference to the lesser lights was 
passed over rather lightly. I feel that a much more detailed 
explanation as to their actual position in regard to the pedestal 
might have helped to clear up the confusion that exists among the 
various Lodges and their members when the lights are being explained 
to the Candidate in the Entered Apprentice Degree. 



- 11 - 



The Broken Column is sorely neglected. Speaking with a lot of 
our Brethren on this subject I came to the conclusion that most of 
the members think that the Benevelent fund fulfills the need and 
charity work in some of the Lodges is practically non-existant. True 
we have general fund raising campaigns that are very, very successful 
for specific purposes, but I would like to see the day when a list of 
donors would be put up on the bulletin board to see how many of the 
members and how much was contributed. The best gift we can give is a 
good example. 

Discussing the matter of the Lewis with a number of the Brethren 
I found out that four out of five did not know what a Lewis was. 
Here again I think that our Masonic Education Committee is negligent. 

The subject of the Lodge Banner to my mind is definitely in need 
of revival. It would be an honour to display something of our 
heritage. To give the Tyler's Toast at the end of the banquet hour 
would be quite an innovation and the Worshipful Master being in 
charge of the festivities it would be entirely up to him to rule on 
the subject. 

2. By R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce, P.D.D.G.M. Toronto Dist. #3, Member 
of Board of General Purposes and a Member of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730. 



Brother John Taylor in his paper speaks of the difference in our 
lodges and rituals in various jurisdictions. His paper expresses the 
knowledge of one that has travelled a lot and spent a lot of time 
studying Masonry and other Grand Lodges. He has found out for 
himself what is done and how it is done throughout the world. 

He speaks of the "Due Guard" which is a mode of recognition 
which is americanism and of comparatively recent origin, being 
unknown to the English and Continental Systems. It is not used in 
our Grand Lodge. In some old books of 1757, the expression is used, 
but only as referring to what is now called the sign. A study will 
show that part of what is called the "Due Guard" is used in the 
signs of our degrees. 

In his reference to "Grand Lodge" he speaks of the Annual 
Communication in July, held at the Royal York Hotel and that we do 
not have a Temple large enough to accommodate the some 3 to 4 
thousand that attend each year. In England and parts of the U.S.A., 
they have large lodge buildings which can house this kind of crowd. 

In his reference to "The Lodge Room", he speaks of the 
differences and similarities of Lodges all over the world, but while 
Masonry is universal, the visible differences make Masonry 
interesting. We must remember that the principles and teachings of 
the craft are the same no matter where we travel in this world where 
Masonry exists. 

In "The Broken Column" he talks of Masonic Institutions, 
hospitals and homes for the old aged in England and Other Countries. 
The Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario is a fairly 
young Grand Lodge and we do have our own benevolent programs and 
charitable funds. Masonic homes and hospitals in England where a 
part of Masonry long before our Grand Lodge was started. Today like 
a lot of other things the demise of these institutions are upon us 
due to the lack of funds to keep them up. Again a study will show 
that back some four to five hundred years ago the value of the 
dollar and a mans labour went a lot further than it does today. It 



12 



is well to note at this point that it cost a man in some cases more 
than a months wages to become a Mason, and today the average cost in 
our Grand Lodge is far less than one weeks pay. 

Brother Taylor is to be congratulated on the work of his paper 
and indeed on his Masonic endeavours in the past. I do believe that 
it is necessary to bring to the Brethren of our Grand Lodge knowledge 
of what goes on in other Grand Lodges and the differences of our 
systems and rituals, while we still maintain the principles and 
teachings of the Craft. But I must say that we not only fail to 
teach our Brethren the differences of other Grand Lodges but we 
Initiate, Pass and Raise them without teaching them the basic 
principles of the Craft. We then hand them a book and hope they will 
find out for themselves. Few get by while others become only a 
number and name on our books . When will we change? 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION 

Following the formal reviews, the Worshipful Master invited 
informal discussion from the Brethren. 

W.Bro. George Zwicker, (who had recently returned from a visit 
to Australia) explained that in Lodges he had visited in the State of 
Victoria, the traditional tripod with the suspended stone is located 
in the West near the Sr. Warden's Station, and it is the Jr. Deacon's 
responsibility to raise and lower the cubic stone at the opening and 
closing of the Lodge, by means of the minature winch with the "Lewis" 
pin in the stone. W.Bro. Zwicker also described a portion of the 
installation Ceremony of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Victoria, in Melborne. 

V. W.Bro. Ernest Brown reminded the Brethren that there is more 
than one type of lewis pin. He went on to say that one type could 
be seen in the Lodge Room in Stratford, Ontario, and a different 
type could be seen in the Chisholm Street Temple in Toronto. 

R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph stated that Bro. Taylor's paper is a good 
example of the need for further research in Masonic Symbols that 
many Masons simply take for granted. As an example, Bro. Ralph made 
reference to the shape of the gravel, stating that some lodges use a 
gavel with the face of the head having the appearance of a gothic 
arch, sometimes referred to as the dormer gavel. Perhaps further 
research is required to determine which type, either the "dormer 
gaval", or the "setting maul", is the true masonic gavel. The use 
and need of the warden's columns is another masonic symbol that 
should be examined in more detail. 

R. W.Bro. Roy Sparrow enquired as to the status of a "Lewis" in 
Ontario; for example, if a "Lewis" is initiated in Scotland at age 
18, can he visit a Lodge in our Grand Jurisdiction and could he 
receive the other degrees? 

V. W.Bro. Ernest Brown responded to say that a "Lewis is 
elegible for affiliation in a Craft Lodge in Ontario, and if 
accepted, he would be entitled to receive the other degrees. 

R. W.Bro. James Hutchinson confirmed the above comments, by 
citing an example of a personal friend who came to Canada as a Lewis 
and subsequently affiliated with a Lodge and received other degrees 
in Freemasonry. 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on R. W.Bro. Keith 
Flynn, who thanked Bro. John Taylor as the author of the paper and 



- 13 - 

all those who participated in the formal and informal discussions, 
which was heartly endorsed by the applause of the Brethren. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Following the Regular Meeting of the Lodge, the 

Reviewer's Comments as well as a copy of the notes 
as printed above under the heading "Informal 
Discussion," were sent to Brother Taylor for his 
response which is printed as follows: 

AUTHOR'S SUMMARY 

I am quite aware that one of the major defects of this paper was 
that is was too short. It had been my intention to expand from the 
written word as I progressed in its reading, but that was not to be. 
Brother Ralph has commented on the gavel . First, this is the 
Worshipful Master's symbol of authority, and it is also designated a 
maul and a hiram. Bernard Jones in his 'Guide and Compendium' 
describes the gavel as actually an iron axe or pick, having a steel 
edge or point and the maul is used synonimously with the gavel. 
However he does say that the name "gavel," a name apparently of 
American origin, was not known in England before the nineteenth 
century, and the gavel as used in English lodges today is taken by 
the Master and his Wardens into the refectory where they are 
continually used in the proposal of toasts. Again quoting Jones, the 
old Dundee Lodge bought in 1739 a set of three 'Hirams'. Brother 
Harry Carr has very little to say on the subject, so I suspect that, 
masonically, there is no true type of gavel. 

Referring to Brother Boratynec's remarks they are most 
interesting but are hardly relative to the contents of what I wrote. 
A subject like the lesser lights seem to be explained well enough in 
the ritual and this is the attitude taken by Brother Colin Dyer in 
his book on 'Symbolism'. 

Brother Frank Bruce has a lot of kind words for me, and I will 
deal with his comments on Masonic Homes and Charities. It is true 
that the homes date back to the eighteenth century, but the first 
Masonic hospital was started in London England in 1916, and the 
present building is less than 50 years old. It was opened in 1932. 
Brother Frank Bruce wonders aloud about the lack of instruction to 
newly passed and raised brethren. I have one solution. Do not be in 
such a hurry to confer degrees. In England - as an extreme - they 
take at least six months between application and initiation, and as 
much as a year between each subsequent degree. In Canada, I believe 
consideration is being given to a required minimum period before a 
new master mason can make application to join any other masonic body. 
In the past, certain masonic bodies have endeavoured to obtain new 
members as soon as they receive their third degree. In some cases 
the Craft Lodges have suffered. I shall conclude these remarks with 
a question. Why is it that whenever a Grand Lodge Officer is 
addressed, he is greeted according to his rank; however, if a Master 
Mason appears, wearing the William Mercer Wilson Medal*, he passes 
unrecognized. This has happened to me in Canada as well as in 
England. 

*There are very few such medals, and since it is somewhat similar to 
a Past Master's Jewel, it may be mistaken for the same. 



- 14 - 



Before resuming the Regular Business of the Lodge, the 
Worshipful Master gave permission to any Brethren wishing to retire 
at this time to do so; he also extended an invitation to any visitors 
to remain in the Lodge if they wished. Returned to the next order of 
Business at 9:35 p.m. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, Chairman of the Committee, reported 
that the members of the Committee met on Wednesday evening, April 9th, 
1980, in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple. And since a copy of 
the minutes of that meeting had been received by all Members of the 
Committee, and since one or two of the important topics would come up 
under General Business, he would not expand upon them at this time. 
However, he did remind all the Lodge Officers, Lodge/District 
Representatives and the Chairmen of all Standing and Appointed 
Committees, that the next meeting would be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple, Wednesday evening, August 20th, 1980, at 
7:30 p.m. All reports are to be presented in writing. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

The Worshipful Master, in reviewing the correspondence from 
R.W.Bro. A.D. Grant, and noting that his lodge dues were paid up to 
August 31st, 1981, instructed the Lodge Secretary to issue the 
requested demit. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by 
W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley, that The Heritage Lodge should endeavour, 
through proper procedure, to obtain a copy of the video tape 
recording the Installation of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Victoria, Australia. Motion carried. 

V. W.Bro. Randall Langs presented the report of the Committee 
appointed to review the Regular Meeting date of the Lodge. After 
reviewing first the Regular Meeting nights of the 645 Lodges in the 
Grand Jurisdiction and then the Regular Meeting nights of the 135 
Lodges of which the 247 members of The Heritage Lodge are also 
members and also noting that the fewest Lodges in the Grand 
Jurisdiction and the fewest members (three) of our Lodge meet on the 
4th Wednesday, he thereofre recommended that we change from the 
present 3rd Wednesday to the 4th Wednesday. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. D.C. Bradley, that the Regular Meeting Night of The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C. be changed from the 3rd Wednesday, to 
the 4th Wednesday of September, November, March and May. 

Considerable discussion followed, reference was made to 
conflict of meeting nights with other masonic bodies. A poll of the 
Lodge was taken, and 5 members present would not be able to attend 
on the 4th Wednesday. 

At this time, R.W.Bro. Alan Newell circulated copies of a type 
written sheet with a number of points bearing on the topic at hand. 
Since there were a number of other suggestions that would have a 



- 15 - 



significant effect on the future operations of the Lodge it was 
recommended that R.W.Bro. Newell' s suggestions be referred to the 
Committee on General Purposes and that R.W.Bro. Newell be invited to 
attend the next meeting of the Committee. The original motion was 
withdrawn by the mover and seconder. 

NOTICE OF MOTION 

From the above discussions and in order that every member of 
the Lodge should have an opportunity to reflect on the deliberations, 
R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph gave notice that he would move or cause to be moved 
at the next Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge (September 17, 
19 80) , that the Regular Meeting of the Lodge be changed from the 3rd 
Wednesday to the 4th Wednesday. 

PUBLICATION - RE: LODGE HISTORIAN 

R.W.Bro. Ralph announced that R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood had 
been commissioned by The Heritage Lodge to prepare its first 
publication dealing with the duties and responsibilities of the Lodge 
Historian. The first draft has been reviewed by a number of members 
of the Lodge, and with the current interest and particularly with 
the provision for the new office in the restructured constitution, 
the reviewers recommend with minor changes that the work proceed to 
its final form. 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, seconded by 
W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley that, with approval from Grand Lodge, The 
Heritage Lodge sponsor the printing of the publication. A suggestion 
was added that the Worshipful Master bring a proposal to the next 
meeting of the Committee of General Purposes as to a method of 
obtaining the necessary funds for the project or a means of 
recovering the cost of printing the Bulletin. When put to the vote, 
the original motion was passed unanimously. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

From the recommendations of the last meeting of the Committee 
of General Purposes, the Worshipful Master appointed the following 
members to a Special Finance Committee with instructions to study 
the Financial Structure of the Lodge and to investigate the 
possibility of offering a Life Membership in the Lodge: R.W.Bros. 
Clare Parsons, Ed. Wilson, Donald Grinton, Ed. Ralph and V. W.Bro. 
RAndall Langs. 

The Special Finance Committee met in Brantford, and as a result 
of their deliberations, R.W.Bro. Ed. Wilson gave the following 
notice of motion and requested a good attendance at the next meeting 
to discuss the alternatives. 

NOTICE OF MOTION 

I (R.W.Bro. W. Edwin C. Wilson) hereby give notice that, at the 
next Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., A.F. & 
A.M. I will move or cause to be moved: 



- 16 



(a) that paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 of Article XII of the by-laws be 
deleted in their entirety and the following substituted in their 
stead: 

INITIATION 

1. The fee for initiation shall be $500.00 which shall include 
the Grand Lodge Fee for registration and certificate, and a 
Master Mason's apron. 

AFFILIATION 

2. The fee for affiliation shall be $15.00 and shall accompany 
the application for affiliation. 

ANNUAL DUES 

3. The annual dues for each member shall be $15.00 payable in 
advance. The annual dues shall be pro-rated on the bais of $1.50 
for each month remaining from the date of membership into the 
Lodge until the following Sept. 1st, to a maximum of $15.00. 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP 

4. In lieu of annual dues, a member may elect to become a Life 
Member by making one lump-sum payment to the Lodge. This lump- 
sum payment shall be in accordance with the terms of Appendix A 
of these by-laws. 

(b) that the following be added to Article XVI of the by-laws: 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 

7. All monies received in payment of Life Memberships shall be 
deposited in a separate account known as the Life Membership 
Account, and invested from time to time in Charter Bank or Trust 
Company Certificates, or similar securities. 

8. The Fund shall be administered by the Committee of General 
Purposes, which shall ensure that the interest from the invested 
sum shall be transferred to the Operating Fund from time to time, 
and that no encroachment on the principal amount shall take 
place except in accordance with the terms of Appendix A of these 
by-laws. 

(c) that the first and second sentences of paragraph 1 of Article 
XVI be changed to read: 

There shall be three funds maintained in the name of the Lodge, 
in a Chartered Bank or Trust Company as approved by the Lodge. 
The Funds shall be known as (a) The Operating Fund, (b) The 
Capital Fund, and (c) The Life Membership Fund. 



BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. James H. Hutchinson, that the ballot be taken collectively. 
Motion carried. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applications, the 
Worshipful Master declared the following Brethre eligible for 
membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, by Affiliation, and 
requested that each new member affix his signature in the Lodge 
Register at his earliest convenience in token of submission to the 
Lodge By-Laws : 

R.W.Bros., Donald James Emerick, Burton Stanley Freer and Aksel 
Aggerholm; 






- 17 - 



V.W.Bro. William John Brock; 

W.Bros., F. Harland Seens, John Kenneth Marty, Leverne Ferguson, 
John M. Boersma, and George Robert Jackson; 

Bro. Eugene Charlton Gerhart. 

LODGE PROXY 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. James Hutchinson, seconded 
by V.W.Bro. Ralph Gardiner that V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos, a Past Master of 
this Lodge, be delegated to represent The Heritage Lodge No. 730 at 
the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge to be held in the City of 
Toronto, Ontario, on Wednesday, the 16th day of July, 19 80, in the 
absence of the Master and Wardens. Motion carried. 

V.W.Bro. Randall Langs reminded all Members, who will be 
attending Grand Lodge, in addition to registering for their Mother 
Lodge, to also register under The Heritage Lodge in Waterloo 
District. 

W.Bro. Balfour Le Gresley reported that The Heritage Lodge will 
be organizing an exhibit for The Heritage of Masonry Display at 
Grand Lodge, and made a special appeal for volunteers to bring 
masonic artifacts to Toronto and to help with the display. 

NOTE: Please contact W.Bro. Le Gresley at 213 Riverside Dr., 
Toronto, Ontario, M6S 4A8, phone (416) 769-3804. 

Following a number of announcements for coming events, the Lodge 
was closed in harmony at 10:07 p.m., and the Brethren adjourned to 
the Banquet Hall for a social hour of refreshments and fellowship. 

J. Pos, Secretary 



IN MEMORIUM 

Brother Fredrick Howse 

Member of General Mercer Lodge No. 548; 

Affiliated with The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 

March 15, 1978; 

Passed to The Grand Lodge Above, 

December 20, 1979. 

W. Brother Lewis J. la Vine 

Member of Queen City Lodge No. 552; 

Affiliated with The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 

November 16, 1977; 

Passed to The Grand Lodge Above, 

January 29, 1980. 



We cherish their memory in our hearts 



18 - 



COMING EVENTS 



JULY 13, 1980 (Sunday) - Grand Lodge 125th Anniversary Divine 
Service, to be held at the Bandshell, Canadian National 
Exhibition grounds, Toronto at 3:00 p.m. Sermon "Affirming Our 
Heritage - Seeking the Future" R.W.Bro. Keith Tudor, Grand 
Chaplain; with assistance from the Speed Lodge Choir under the 
direction of R.W.Bro. James J. Spark. 

JULY 15, 1980 (Tuesday) - A Play - "The Birth of Our Grand Lodge", 
at 2:00 p.m., in the Canadian Room, Royal York Hotel. 
Admission by ticket. 

JULY 16-17, 1980 (Wednesday & Thursday) - One Hundred and Twenty- 
Fifth Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. From 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
on Wednesday, there will be a "HERITAGE OF MASONRY DISPLAY" of 
exhibits of artifacts and memorabilia in the Royal York Hotel. 
Grand Master's Banquet at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, in the Canadian 
Room. The Guest Speaker, R.W.Bro. H.A. Leal, will discuss 
"New Lamps for Old". Entertainment by the University of Guelph 
Choir. 

AUGUST 20, 1980 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee Meeting in 
the Preston-Hespeler Temple, at 7:30 p.m. A large attendance 
of the membership would be most helpful as several important 
subjects will be presented for approval. 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge, and the Annual Election of Officers. W.Bro. George 
Campbell, Charter Member of THe Heritage Lodge will present a 
paper jointly prepared by himself and R.W.Bro. J. Lawrence 
Runnalls, titled "OUR GRAND MASTERS, A.F. & AM., G.R.C., 
1855-1980. 

OCTOBER 4, 1980 (Saturday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast of 

Wellington District, will be visiting St. Andrew's Lodge No. 
56 0, Ottawa, to dramatize in full costume of the period, a 
typical 18th Century Lodge Meeting and Initiation Ceremony. 
This will be their twenty- third production. 

OCTOBER 15, 1980 (Wednesday) - The 18th Century Degree Cost of 
Wellington District, will be visiting Niagara Lodge No. 2, 
Niagara-on-the-Lake, to present their 18th Century Play. 

OCTOBER 30, 1980 (Thursday) - The Fall Meeting of the Worshipful 
Master's, Past Master's and Warden's Association of Waterloo 
District will meet in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at 
8:00 p.m., hosted by Cambridge Lodge No. 728. 

NOVEMBER 19, 19 80 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
and Annual Installation of the Worshipful Master and the 
Investiture of the Officers. 

Other Masonic Papers to be presented at future meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for example: 
Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, Rosicrucians, 
Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges 
formerly on the Register and now struck off, by Bro. John E. 
Taylor. 



19 - 



3. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 

4. Masonic Research Lodges - An Up-To-Date Review. 

5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian Chief 
by V.W.Bro. Jack Pos . 



Other Suggestions: 



1. 



Anti-Masonic Groups - individual, political, ecclesiastical etc., 
suggested by R.W.Bro. E.J. Burns Anderson. 



2. Lodge Tracing Boards - An illustrated presentation and 

discussion of the symbolism. Please send individual suggestions 
and historical material on tracing boards to V.W.Bro. J. Pos. 



NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF LODGE/DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES 
ALGOMA EASTERN 

No Representative No Representative 



ALGOMA EAST 



FRONTENAC 



John E. Taylor 
P.O. Box 39 
Hilton Beach, Ontario 
POR 1G0 
(705) 246-2238 
Ionic #25 



Allan J. Cohoe 
243 Helen Street 
Kingston, Ontario 
K7L 4P5 
(613) 542-5627 
Queen's #578 



BRANT 



Fred W. Bowery 
44 Park Rd. N. 
Brantford, Ontario 
N3S 6T4 
(519) 752-3438 
Doric #121 



GEORGIAN 

No Representative 



BRUCE 



GREY 



E . James Scarborough 
316 - 9th Street 
Hanover, Ontario 
N4N 1L6 
(519) 364-1040 
Hanover #432 



Wm. A. Strutt 
955 - 9th Avenue W. 
Owen Sound, Ontario 
N4K 4N8 
(519) 376-6226 
North Star #322 



CHATHAM 



HAMILTON A 



Edsel C. Steen 
286 Lome Ave. 
Wallaceburg, Ontario 
N8A 3Z2 
(519) 627-6633 
Onyx #312 



John E. Brittain 
4171 Inglewood Drive 
Burlington, Ontario 
L7L 1E3 
(416) 637-0113 
Wellington Sq. #725 



20 - 



HAMILTON B 



NIAGARA B 



A.W. Watson 
404 Mount Albion Road 
Hamilton, Ontario 
L8K 5T3 



William A.J. Lowe 
6151 Culp Street 
Niagara Falls 
L2G 2B6 



Carlyle Sask. #216 



HAMILTON C 



NIPPISSING EAST 



C . Laverne Dawdy 
38 Kenmore Road 
Hamilton, Ontario 
L8S 3T7 
(416) 529-6996 
Electric #495 



Neil R. Drury 
23 Beaver Crescent 
North Bay, Ontario 
P. A 3N1 
(705) 472-9771 
North Bay #617 



LONDON EAST 



OTTAWA 1 



Edward Carson 
87 Thornton Ave. 
London, Ontario 
N5Y 2Y4 
(519) 439-5628 
Union #380 



Wm. B. Bolton 
1147 Minnetonka Road 
Ottawa, Ontario 
K2G 2T8 

Prince of Wales #317 



LONDON WEST 



OTTAWA 2 



Raymond Crinklaw 
21 Broadway Ave. 
Lambeth, Ontario 
NOL ISO 
(519) 652-2025 
St. Paul's #107 



Glen T. Jones 
6 2 Nanook Court 
Kanata, Ontario 
K2L 2B1 

By town #721 



MUSKOKA PARRY SOUND 



ONTARIO 



Eric Sisel 

P.O. Box 2461 

Huntsville, Ontario 

P0A 1K0 

(705) 635-2071 

Unity #376 



Robert S. Throop 
R.R. #2, Taunton Rd 
Oshawa, Ontario 
LkH 7K5 
(416) 723-0622 
Temple #666 



NIAGARA A 



PETERBOROUGH 



George A. Campbell 
41 Albert Street 
St. Catharines, Ontario 
L2R 2G8 
(416) 684-7803 
Maple Leaf #103 



George E. Zwicker 
499 O'Connel Road 
Peterborough, Ontario 
K9J 4E1 
(705) 743-2113 
Corintian #101 



21 



PRINCE EDWARD 

No Representative 



TEMISKAMING 

No Representative 



ST. THOMAS 



TORONTO 1 



G.R. (Bob) Jackson 
68 Balaclava Street 
St. Thomas, Ontario 
N5P 3C4 
(519) 633-4937 
St. David's #302 



James W. Gerrard 
82 Glenwood Crescent 
Toronto, Ontario 
M4B 1K1 
(416) 755-6746 
General Mercer #548 



SARNIA 



TORONTO 2 



Donald James Emerick 
506 George Street 
Sarnia, Ontario 
N7T 4P9 

Otisippi #719 



Albert L. Lee 
4 53 Broadway Ave. 
Toronto, Ontario 
M4G 2R4 
(416) 422-0121 
Melita #605 



ST. LAWRENCE 



TORONTO 3 



Donald J. Woodside 
81 Park Street 
Brockville, Ontario 
K6V 5W1 
(613) 342-2243 
Sussex #5 



Charles E. Drew 
5 Scotland Road 
Agincourt, Ontario 
MIS 1L5 
(416) 293-9587 
Georgina #343 



SOUTH HURON 



TORONTO 4 



Keith R.A. Flynn 
P.O. Box 119, Main Street 
Atwood, Ontario 
NOG 1B0 
(519) 356-2845 
Elma #456 



Stanley W. Lyons 
413 East Ave. 
West Hill, Ontario 
MIC 2W7 
C416) 284-1974 
Canada #532 



SUDBURY MANITOULIN 



TORONTO 5 



Terrance John Thorn 

Box 771, 340 Avery Drive 

Espanola, Ontario 

POP 1C0 

(705) 869-1994 

Espanola #527 



Edmund V. Ralph 
56 Castlegrove Blvd. 
Don Mills, Ontario 
M3A 1L2 
(416) 447-4152 
Ashlar #247 



22 



TORONTO 6 



WILSON 



Thomas G. Roberts 
7 Mira Road 
Thornhill, Ontario 
L3T 2H5 
(516) 889-9167 
Patterson #265 



Stewart L. Thurtell 
329 Oxford Street 
Ingersoll, Ontario 
N5C 2W4 
(519) 485-2283 
King Hiram #37 



TORONTO 7 

C.E. Balfour LeGresiey 
213 Riverside Drive 
Toronto, Ontario 
M6S 4A8 
(416) 769-3804 
University #496 



WINDSOR 

James Noble Hayes 
4 Cypress Crt. Comp. 
McGregor, Ontario 
NOR 1J0 
(519) 726-6993 
Palace #604 



#196 



NORTH HURON 

James DeZeeuw 
Box 64, Elora Street 
Teeswater, Ontario 
NOG 2S0 
(519) 392-6879 
Teeswater #276 



VICTORIA 

No Representative 



WATERLOO 

Charles F. Grimwood 
446 Margaret Street 
Cambridge (P) , Ontario 
N3H 3X7 
(519) 653-6930 
Preston #297 



WELLINGTON 

W. Edwin C. Wilson 
7 Orchard Blvd. 
Georgetown, Ontario 
L7G 2Y5 
(416) 877-3556 
Credit #219 



WESTERN 

No Representative 



23 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 

1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Norval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, NlH 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M.W.Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Lewis Hahn 

75 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 







LODGE OFFICERS 








1978-79 




W.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


Donald S. Grinton 


Tyler 


R.W.Bro. C.F. Grimwood 


P.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


Keith R.A. Flynn 


Sec'y 


V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos 


S.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


Ronald E. Groshaw 


A/Sec' y 




J.W. 


W.Bro. 


George E. Zwicker 


Treas. 


R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 


S.D. 


W.Bro. 


Balfour LeGresley 


D.C. 


R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 


J.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


David C. Bradley 


Chap. 


W.Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 


I.G. 


R.W.Bro. 


C.E. Drew 


Organist 


R.W.Bro. L.R. Hertel 


S.S. 


R.W.Bro. 


Robert Throop 


Historian 


W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar 


J.S. 


W.Bro. 


Albert A. Barker 







LODGE COMMITTEES FOR 1979-80 

GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, (S.W.); 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, 

(J.W.): W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); and R.W.Bro. David C. 
Bradley. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley, (S.D.); V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. 
Bert Mennie; and R.W.Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Robert Throop, (S.S.) 
W.Bro. Albert A. Barker, (J.S.); Local Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. C.E. 
Grimwood, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. Gary 
Powell; and V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairm, V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod; and R.W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. 



CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. 

James Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw; 
W.Bro. Paul Engel; and W.Bro. Kenneth Bartlett. 



- 24 



LODGE LIBRARY -Chairman, W.Bro.Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 
Steen; and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after a Brother's 

name, this is an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge 
By-Laws. The duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in 
Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for 
an annual budget. 

LATE NEWS - Several Brethren are contemplating the possibility of 
reserving a room at the Royal Hotel during the Annual 
Communication of The Grand Lodge for Tuesday or Wednesday 
nights, to be identified as The Heritage Lodge Room. This 
would provide a common meeting place for Lodge Brothers 
coming from different parts of the Province. Please check 
the bulletin board near the Receptio Lounge of the Hotel 
when you arrive, for further particulars. 

In any event, look for our exhibit assembled for the 
Heritage of Masonry Display on the same floor as the Banquet 
Hall. This should be a good focal point if you are looking 
for someone from the Lodge. 

May I extend to you and your families, a sincere wish 
for a relaxing, enjoyable and safe summer vacation. 

Fraternally, 

Jack Pos